Lab 6 outline

Lab 6 outline - Fungal Ecology Lab 6 Fungi are NOT plants...

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Fungal Ecology Lab 6 Fungi are NOT plants More closely related to eukaryotes WHY?? Characteristics common to both fungi and animals (synapomorphies): Use chitin as a structural material Fungal cell walls and insect exoskeletons Heterotrophic Glucose stored as glycogen Fungal lifestyles Fungi CANNOT photosynthesize, so they must obtain their food using other methods. Saprotrophic : fungi that live on dead organic matter Most fungi fall into this category. Important ecological role Parasitic : fungi that obtain food and nutrients from other organisms; the other organism is harmed in this process. Mutualistic /Symbiotic : fungi associate with and obtain food from other organisms in a mutually beneficial relationship Key characteristics: Filamentous fungal body consisting of cytoplasmic filaments called hyphae . Contain haploid nucleus A mass of hyphae = mycelium feeding structure Fungal cell walls composed of chitin Reproduction Fungi differ from most other sexually reproducing organisms. Haploid stage of life cycle is dominant
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course BIOL 112 taught by Professor Vaughn during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M.

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Lab 6 outline - Fungal Ecology Lab 6 Fungi are NOT plants...

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