12 Size Perception

12 Size Perception - a. Results in a loss of accommodation...

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Size Perception I. Relative Size as Cue to Distance a. The size of an object on our retinas corresponds to the objects actual size and its distance i. ii. An object must be twice as big at twice the distance to create the same sized retinal object b. Perceived Size = Retinal Image * Perceived Distance i. We cannot gauge an object’s size without distance information ii. c. Holway and Boring Study i. They randomly displayed different sized objects one at a time along a hallway at varying distances so that the objects always resulted in the same retinal image size ii. By slowly taking away distance information, they were able to show that distance information is crucial in determining the size of objects based on a retinal image iii. 1. Binocular – subjects’ vision was unrestricted 2. Monocular – subjects had to close one eye a. Results in a loss of stereopsis and convergence 3. Artificial Pupil – subjects looked through a pin hole, putting everything into focus
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Unformatted text preview: a. Results in a loss of accommodation 4. Reduction Tunnel subjects looked through a funnel, blocking out everything around the object (i.e., the hallway) a. Results in loss of most monocular cues (e.g., linear perspective, texture gradient, relative size) II. Optical Illusions a. Created when one is given misleading distance information, which then distorts the perceived size of objects extrapolated from the objects retinal size b. i. Linear perspective and height in the field (left image) gives the impression that the top line is farther away and so must be bigger 1. This effect is exaggerated when more optic cues for distance are given (right) ii. The bottom one is actually 20% bigger! c. Mueller-Lyer Illusion d. i. The far corner (left) looks farther away than the near corner (right) e. Horizontal-vertical Illusion: f. g. Moon Illusion: h....
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12 Size Perception - a. Results in a loss of accommodation...

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