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Chapter 12 - I Chapter 12 Marriage and the Family Adoption...

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4.30.3 Chapter 12 – Marriage and the Family I) Adoption a. Family – people who consider themselves related by blood, marriage or adoption b. Household – all those who occupy the same housing unit i. Family or Orientation – family an individual grows up in ii. Family of Procreation – family individuals forms in couples when they have children c. Marriage – a group’s approved mating arrangement II) Common Cultural Themes of Marriage and Family a. Mate Selection – each societies have norms that govern who marries whom b. Descent (system of descent) – the way people trace kinship over generations i. Bilateral System – relation follows through both paternal and maternal sides of the family 1. Other systems are the “patrilineal system” and the “matrilineal system” c. Inheritance – used to compute rights of inheritance d. Authoirty – all cultures follow “patriarchy” – where the men have authority over the women i. Although some cultures are becoming more and more egalitarian III) Marriage and Family in theoretical Perspective a. Functionalist Perspective: i. Why the Family is Universal – it fulfills 6 needs that are basic to survival 1. (1) Economic production, (2) socialization of children, (3) care of the sick and aged, (4) recreation, (5) sexual control, (6) reproduction ii. Function of the Incest Taboo: 1. Helps families to avoid role confusion which helps with the socialization of children in that it makes the relationships clear between all members of the family 2. It forces people to look outside the family for marriage which helps to form alliances between groups of people iii. Isolation and Emotional Overload: 1. Nuclear families are dysfunctional in that they are isolated and offer less people for emotional/material support a. This makes it vulnerable to “emotional overload” because it has less people to spread stress around b. Conflict Perspective: i. Families fight over the scarce resources of time, energy, and the leisure to pursue interesting activities, which makes it a struggle to do the least work 1. Men usually win this battle c. Symbolic-Interactionist Perspective: i. Husbands and wives who make equal income usually share the household work the most equally ii.
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