ES-ch. 14 summary - sequential fallacy, begging the...

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11-19-07 Effective Speaking Chapter Summary- Ch. 14 -argumentation is a process of advancing propositions or claims supported by good reason -criticism is a process of careful assessment, evaluation, and judgment of ideas and motives -arguments are built from three elements: the claim, the evidence, and the reasoning pattern -the types of claims common to arguments are claims of fact, claims of value, and claims of policy -evidence for arguments can be chosen to reflect the rational quality of the claim (rationally relevant evidence) or to stimulate audience involvement (motivationally relevant evidence) -five forms of reasoning connect evidence and claims: reasoning from examples, reasoning from generalization, reasoning from sign, reasoning from parallel case, and reasoning from cause -a fallacy is a flaw in the rational properties of an argument or inference -common fallacies are hasty generalization, genetic fallacy, appeal to ignorance, bandwagon fallacy,
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Unformatted text preview: sequential fallacy, begging the question, appeal to authority, and name-calling-in developing argumentative speeches, a) organize your arguments by putting the strongest first or last, b) vary the evidence, c) avoid personal attacks on opponents, d) know the potential arguments of your opponents, and e) practice constructing logical arguments and detecting fallacious ones KEY TERMS-appeal to authority-appeal to ignorance-argument-argumentation-bandwagon fallacy-begging the question-claims-claim of fact-claim of policy-claim of value-fallacy-genetic fallacy-hasty generalization-name-calling-patterns of reasoning-primacy-recency effects-reasoning-reasoning from cause-reasoning from examples-reasoning from generalization-reasoning from parallel case-reasoning from sign-sequential fallacy...
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course COMMUNICAT unknown taught by Professor Kali during the Fall '08 term at Mass Colleges.

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