Chicano Youth & Identity [Term Paper 2]

Chicano Youth & Identity [Term Paper 2] - Navarrete,...

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N a v a r r e t e , R o d r i g o P a g e | 1 Mexicans: Do They Dare Dream? Intro to Chicano Studies :: Response Paper 2 As children, we are taught to strive for success. People grow up and grow older hoping that one day their dreams, aspirations, and childhood fantasies will all become realities. Children constantly dream and fantasize about a successful future; moreover, the prospect of living the American Dream becomes something to not only strive for, but something to sacrifice and fight for. For decades upon decades people of Mexican American lineage were denied their opportunity to live the American Dream. As early as the Mexican defeat by the United States in 1848, Mexican Americans were forced to live a life of poverty and despair. Terrible jobs, low wages, inferior education, and bleak futures awaited every newborn of Mexican descent in the United States. Sometime in the early to mid 1900s, though, the social revolution began to take form. A few Mexican Americans finally realized that the American Dream could, in fact, be the Mexican American Dream . “White persons with Spanish surnames” [Lopez 43] suddenly came to the realization that they, too, had a voice in society. One person who came to this realization was Ernesto Galarza. Galarza, a “24-year-old
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Chicano Youth & Identity [Term Paper 2] - Navarrete,...

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