VOCAB - Ignoring-a principle of behavior management that involves removing all reinforcement for a given behavior to eliminate that behavior

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Ignoring-a principle of behavior management that involves removing all reinforcement for a given behavior to eliminate that behavior. Imagery-a relaxation technique in which a mental image such as “float like a feather” or “melt like ice” in invoked. I message-Thomas Gordon’s term for a response to a child’s behavior that focuses on how the adult feels rather than on the child’s character. Immersion programs-an approach to teaching a second language to children by surrounding or immersing them in that language. Individualized Education Plan-Mandated by Public Law such a plan must be designed for each child with disabilities and must involve parents as well as teachers and other appropriate professionals. Individualized Family Service Plan-Required by the 1986 Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments for Handicapped children under the age of 3 and their families; the IFSP often developed by a transdisciplinary team that includes the parents, determines goals and objectives that build on the strengths of the child and family. Inductive reasoning-A guidance approach in which the adult helps the child see the Industry vs. Inferiority-The fourth stage of development described by Erik Erikson, starting at the end of the preschool years and lasting until puberty, in which the child focuses on the development of competence. Information processing-a model of cognitive development, somewhat analogous to how a computer functions, concerned primarily with how human beings take in and store information. Initiative vs. Guilt-The 3 rd stage of development described by Erik Erikson, occurring during the preschool years, in which the child’s curiosity and enthusiasm lead to a need to explore and learn about the world and in which rules and expectations begin to be established. Innatist view of language development-the view that inborn factors are the most importanat component of language development. Interactionist view of language development-the view that language develops through a combination of inborn factors and environmental influences. Interpersonal moral rules-considered as universal, including prohibitions against harm to others, murder, incest, & theft.
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Interpretive stage-stage of parenting defined by Ellen Galinsky typifying the parent of an older preschooler or school-aged child who faces the task of explaining and clarifying the world to the child. Invented spelling-used by young children in their early attempts to write by finding the speech sound that most clearly fits what they want to convey. Key experiences-in the cognitively oriented curriculum, the 8 cognitive concepts on which activities are built.
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course HIST 1301 taught by Professor Harvey during the Spring '08 term at Hill College.

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VOCAB - Ignoring-a principle of behavior management that involves removing all reinforcement for a given behavior to eliminate that behavior

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