ebola - Ebola Virus Alison Tenenbaum The disease called...

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Ebola Virus Alison Tenenbaum The disease called Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever is the result of an infection with the Ebola virus. It is a member of the family of viruses called Filoviridae, which also includes Marburg Virus. 1 Ebola is a highly virulent hemorrhagic fever, a group of illnesses caused by the virus families of Arenavirus, Filoviridae, Bunyaviridae and Flavivirus. Some other examples of VHFs are Dengue fever and Lassa fever. Ebola virus was first recognized near the Ebola River in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) in Africa, which gave the virus its name when it first broke out in 1976. Ebola has also broken out in Sudan, the Ivory Coast, and in Reston, Virginia (no humans progressed to disease in Reston, though four were infected). 2 Ebola is an acute disease, meaning it has a very sudden onset, and there is no carrier state. Because the reservoir host of Ebola is unknown, the manner in which the virus first manifests itself in a human to begin an outbreak is also a mystery. 3 The best hypothesis researchers have come up with is that the first person comes into contact with an infected animal or its excrement and becomes infected. Secondary infections are caused by contact with the infected or their bodily fluids and secretions. The exact device that Ebola uses to infect its victim is unknown, but the virus systematically destroys the heart, blood vessels, and other internal organs. It causes mass hemorrhaging and in many cases, organ failure. Even more disturbing is the fact that in most cases of Ebola, the patient dies with no signs of an immune response. 4 The hosts of Ebola are known to be humans, and in the 1 Harper, Tara. "Ebola: Description, Vector, Mechanisms, Symptoms, etc. ." Ebola . 2005. 1 May 2007 <http://www.tarakharper.com/v_ebola.htm>. 2 Id. 3 "Questions and Answers about Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever." Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever . 2005. Centers for Disease Control. 1 May 2007 <http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/spb/mnpages/dispages/ebola/qa.htm>. 4 Harper, Tara. "Ebola: Description, Vector, Mechanisms, Symptoms, etc. ." Ebola . 2005. 1 May 2007 <http://www.tarakharper.com/v_ebola.htm>.
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outbreak in Reston, macaque monkeys. Ebola has also occurred in gorillas and other primates. Again, since the reservoir is unknown, it is hard to know how the original
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course BIOLOGY 10100 taught by Professor Huie during the Spring '06 term at Ithaca College.

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ebola - Ebola Virus Alison Tenenbaum The disease called...

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