{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

sample_mt2c - Problem#0'2‘ Pfifi’g’ in a...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Problem #0 _ , _ ('2‘ Pfifi’g’) in a zero-gravity environment, an astronaut sets five lead balls moving on circular paths as shown below. Each ball is tethered by a string of length i. attached at the center of its circle. The oniy force actin on each baii is the tension in is string. them to make a complete 'circle), from shortest period to longest. Indicate any ties. F..——---—.-—___.—-———..._‘————-—_____ 511 «+55% low? es+ PEP? r) rP—Dr i‘bc‘ 13) Rank the five balls according to the tension in their strings, from lowest tension _ to highest. Indicate any ties. ‘ Multiple Choice: 1) A rock is traveling in a circle at the end of a string, as shown in the overhead view below. if the string suddenly breaks, which of the five paths shown will the rock follow? (Note: since this is an overhead view, you can neglect any effects of gravity...or simply assume that the whole story takes place in a zero~gravity environment.) / r l 'fl—H’" (is; flea 19¢” {rat-‘95 K \nerf" K a 2) In the diagram below, the instantaneous velocity and acceleration vectors of five different objects are shown. For each object, pick one of the following choices: a) The object is speeding up. D) The obiect is slowing down. c) The object is neither speeding up nor slowing down. 1’9 é f ’3'}? i a??? 3739/ 63 Q i @5366} 3 ,2 SEMI-Eta filflfi 4 L (“(134 ' P 35': §+Gucl$ (Fan {1 LVIJyg (incl WM fiwi'i‘aheoflse re(eq${§ ‘Four WLE‘QQ} an 0L which Evfm‘l‘ “a”? 111'):— +l£ river Laban P391713 A $113 fimfly JWWI wk‘z (345%[35 8,, gqvm'l D 5L9, [aumLas w?” T M“ LL14“ 7n %‘\’\nrt€. J3££€Wfl+ CIT’VC‘E’TEWKFX 1'13 Shawn L’G‘GMJ 1* _ ‘ Fri-"hr ET) Rflflx; m £13m?” PELUK‘} QCCOfJI‘r? +0 “Hz-fl OKCIPV 414:7 lath—{V m {Tam 4:?!“ng ’11:: L194“. ImAgcaJ-c, ah? ‘Lffg: Wm? ) £H$+4v WW Luigi" 1x95: - +0 MHZ 1") Rafi“ fl; ‘FOur FELLLfi acrarct‘i‘nfi 40 ‘Haigf g-Fegcé 54- 41A mflMhJ' “HA7 _ ‘41“- 4‘; “4:14-61“; 1Cfom #0194???" "‘0 910M5+, Iflctu‘cg-k (ll-7 +1559. Em¢__l..-flr .1 I] Trudi / Bike, Qmedt‘cmGZ Min-«L! (flack Gflewxfi- +Vlr-fl W" fim‘qfi I“: H"; {fake} M04141? {'3’ (If!) ailing; :1 Ian»; Waijf.) ‘31:: m+ 1+ Let‘flwfg 4rd. Ch‘té‘hfifi, U r CK-w‘rwj i) In arch-”Cor ('1 LirJ 40 'H7 in a. drab), +La “9+ £on Gfl g4 ”“54. 90?”; 'pof'wmrcl CAIN? {+3 Armc-E-fifi UL +raufi" 2) Kinfik £rfc+ibn w?“ ‘Dwflx 1w wM-Evfr Ji‘rfc‘“?on T5; hECEgS-Gwy +9 {DY—chm-J' an $36.57*— ‘Eu’fim Lsz'i-nmir‘j “‘0 9;th arms; :1 Fur‘pacf’- 3) 12F an 01586"‘ T9 H‘MEL] SH“? arms; C! 5‘qume “he maguC-IWL a"; W RMR '{EJ‘FCJH‘o-n QC'L‘iny cm H‘ “is q‘wuvg 6'wa +0/0ir "Hm—195, 416 WWW! ‘FOP’Q’. 4) 34: an 9L}{c+ if; in ("awLua‘i‘ wark fl Q‘HY‘FOLEE 1344 E» m f'ftlrvxg/ “Hem “he mufflw EFF-“hf G'l‘u‘Lrfl 'Ffrfif'fi-rafi TS GKW'G-Irf (3?qu “FE/LU; ”hm-{’5 W marmf Far S) A (flake; hauigcfiefi a Curw: cm {,1 Lane} {5'qu TLQ, W wfi— [IL-2L} ‘pm flqi- anew; Lim 4-0 CL: 41M; 3'3 khaki ‘Frrc-l-E‘MJ Push-w? 45WMJ Hoe cen'I-er MGM. 6) T‘F’ M65 6751:94’ “If“; 4‘5 ”MM; ‘er 9am Carvfl qyam), (1+ +kr€6 “M9 m 5996’; as ELWCI he WM“ “954 hing J’vafi"? Q9 much ”pof‘?’ Pad/1mg: 1m +6me M rem—36v, 6.019114 CLWL‘ : ,_.——?———— A; d‘m‘fi {M 901.31%.) Ehffkfi' Pffib‘flwxg ({owf'i' gd‘ue. "HE: PffiEbm (LU-{Hi3 (“flugfi you M M ‘hn-fi {fwihinj fi‘flcl MH‘4O "hf? Icf FAQ (”Vt-C(11) Inflffié yam!” be Making 410/ {Of-Trial flaw? ‘in W €6EWHIE¢5 PrOfU$££ 12‘0” as answgyg Tu. Pfobbm" g‘hiffin? gm rggfi 0c ngfiff 9113-25 alme a ¥r70+f6fl‘€$f Stage 0% Llefgl'l'k Ll EMA amala 19 ‘PFBM *‘flnz 1%;ngth 61.3 an-n Fame; M a level Mk 0"? leg-fk L) qut, ‘HL weF-waqk 0,? Eur-(LET. ‘FJFC‘LEH lag-Mr”! LP!" (3]??? 6?th “R4. fine...” it; ”If A‘H-Cr {9qu aflr 44ml“: nan- ‘Frr‘c’h‘mbgfi 46547.5“; HUN-7+ T5 1‘” ‘Rm' SP’E‘EJ V 37 fl) For 03- Leag—l— fiour (rpm Lu Eq‘w'g-i‘owfi Jaggv'fi56 q s‘amfi‘r? (Led-r h l QhMZAA it?) Egg-km CHEAE‘L: 301% W £3???th Ji‘ffc'K'la. Doe; ymr HMHr Mk ““7 pr'hg 42M Pang-[uh (29 Farris) ' Problem #4: A spring whose spring constant it: 8000 N/m is pulled back a distance L = 0.5 meters. A sled of mass m = 5 kg is placed against the spring. The spring is released, propelling the sled a distance x = 40 meters across an icy lake, then around a vertical loop of. track of radius R = 4 meters, as shown below. On both the track and the lake, the sled moves without friction. a) Calculate the sled's speed at point Bin the above diagram. _._-— —— __-—— b) Calculate the sled's Speed at point C in the above diagram. c) Calculate the normal force acting on the sled at point B. (Him: a free-body diagram will probably help.) _.—-—__ d) Calculate the normal force'acting on the sled at point (3. (Again, a free—body diagram is probably a good idea.) - -———___ _,_.—-—F'_'_-_-—'—'—_—- _ _ —____________ e) if we had used a rolling marble instead of a frictionless sled, would your answers to this question have been any different? Briefly explain why or why not. Extra Credit: (use the back of the facing page <: ------ ) Suppose that the lake is not quite frictionless; the coefficient of friction between the sled and the ice $ka (The track is still frictionless.) What is the maximum value of Pkthat will still allow the sled to make it around the loop without falling off? Problem #3: Ice Cube Wizard In an arrangement similar to an old-fashioned pinball game, an ice cube of mass m = 0.2 kg is placed against a spring of unknown spring constant k, which has been pulled back a distance d = 12 cm from equilibrium The spring is then released, propelling the ice cube up a frictionless slope that rises at 300 above the i horizontal. The cube travels a distance L: 4.0 In before coming (momentarily) -t_c__--_ rest. . Afar a) What is the spring constant k? b) Suppose we tried the experiment again with the same ice cube and spring, but instead of the hill being frictionless, its surface and the ice cube had a coefficient of kinetic friction 31.5 = 0.2. This time, what distance L wili the ice cube travel before coming to rest’f For M Jr§€=€rfiibk mafia“ {TH/9|" “I'M-1 +10, flap-f- ‘H/(fii‘l‘ $1193 61 CLOVER-Ck!” Ih‘n £1 ijfiixt5 wale'} GI. PEVS-fl'fi 43$?st +0 “92 BL $Pri‘r3‘“ lance; ghfiskfin v-Hflwdfj 4"? lflumfl‘n 0L marble, Over” a +‘Ph'hn6‘l’fi'fr 113511 W3” wlnfifln [‘9 she kuflgd‘! M49“ away 1cm“ L”, 5}; 51: “hula-'5 a 691mg when spray (mg’ranlr k : Sxmqbfl Pun; Hr )mrlr aéfig—hnm Z : 45M “Cam Efuilrflmwm} Place; a: may“: fig MEWS m= 503 (titan? mfiffiflfi, an; relays 3-]; [aunt-RC9 41L mafbit ‘Ffwm qrmné Lew, 014— an M’Q Q: {00 'FH'EM ‘I'LB Wr+rrmli &}G[Cu‘w‘{~hz LPG”? launch 9%; V0?” 912:9; *3/14: bah mmLc 74‘ WW wall- ‘5' If 90 karw Musk Jr‘sfinq 3% Hr cm W Wu by. WWW WW 1": n04} WN'F .FOTn-ih 00‘" “Hr: firflmfld .flr on 'hx; we?!” (#1589 H“ V4? ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}