Lecture5AnnelEchino1 - Lecture Topic Annelida and...

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Annelida and Echinodermata Slide 1 Lecture Topic: Annelida and Echinodermata Reading: Invertebrates, CHAPTER 33, pages 638-670.
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Annelida and Echinodermata Slide 2
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Annelida and Echinodermata Slide 3 Figure 32.10, page 634-5 Calcarea Silicarea Ctenophora Cnidaria Echinodermata Chordata Brachiopoda Phoronida Ectoprocta Platyhelminthes Nemertea Mollusca Annelida Rotifera Nematoda Arthropoda “Radiata” “Porifera” Deuterostomia Lophotrochozoa Ecdysozoa Bilateria Eumetazoa Metazoa Ancestral colonial flagellate molecules Where do annelids fit on the tree of life? Who are the echinoderms?
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Annelida and Echinodermata Slide 4 phylum Annelida segmented worms with bodies composed of a series of fused rings annulatus, “annulated”, or “ringed” (from Greek)
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Annelida and Echinodermata Slide 5 The phylum Annelida is divided into three classes Table 33.4 page 653 oligochaetes = oligos, “few”; chaite, “long hair” polychaetes = “almost feet” leeches
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Annelida and Echinodermata Slide 6 Oligochaetes Class Oligochaeta - are named for their relatively sparse chaetae, or bristles made of chitin - include the earthworms and a variety of aquatic species Parapodia
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Annelida and Echinodermata Slide 7 earthworms eat their way through the soil, extracting nutrients as the soil moves through the alimentary canal which helps till and aerate the soil
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Annelida and Echinodermata Slide 8 Anatomy of an earthworm Table 33.23, page 654 Mouth Subpharyngeal ganglion Pharynx Esophagus Crop Gizzard Intestine Metanephridium Ventral vessel Nerve cords Nephrostome Intestine Dorsal vessel Longitudinal muscle Circular muscle Epidermis Cuticle Septum (partition between segments) Anus Each segment is surrounded by longitudinal muscle, which in turn is surrounded by circular muscle. Earthworms coordinate the contraction of these two sets of muscles to move (see Figure 49.25). These muscles work against the noncompressible coelomic fluid, which acts as a hydrostatic skeleton. Coelom. The coelom of the earthworm is partitioned by septa. Metanephridium. Each segment of the worm contains a pair of excretory tubes, called metanephridia, with ciliated funnels, called nephrostomes. The metanephridia remove wastes from the blood and coelomic fluid through exterior pores.
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  • Fall '06
  • 11:00-01:50pm
  • Evolution, Annelida, Annelid, Water vascular system, Echinodermata Slide

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