liquid life - Liquid Life Liquid Life is a compelling book...

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Liquid Life Liquid Life is a compelling book that examines the issues of child birth and abortion in the context of Japanese society. Author William LaFleur presents this topic to the reader from the Japanese point of view and does not mention American ideals until the end. His argument begins with Japanese faith in Buddhism and its outlook on life, death and reincarnation. Buddhist believe that after a person dies they are reincarnated or reborn into new life. Whom or what a person is reincarnated into depends on their karma from the previous life. These Buddhist beliefs are the crux of the Japanese people’s attitudes on children and abortion. In contrast to Western thinking, the Japanese do not see the unborn fetus as a form of life. Instead the baby is not considered alive until after it is born. Even after birth a baby is not seen as a person but is considered as having potential to become one. In Japanese society one becomes a human as they progress through life and learn through socialization what it means to be a member of society. This view on new born life took
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course HISTOTY 680-122 taught by Professor Hesselink during the Spring '08 term at UNI.

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liquid life - Liquid Life Liquid Life is a compelling book...

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