Notes (Week2)

Notes (Week2) - 1. Less primacy effects a. Kruglanski &...

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Notes Kunda, 1990: I) Motivation – “any wish, desire, or preference that concerns the outcome of a given reasoning task” (p. 480) II) Types of Motivation: a. Motivation to arrive at an accurate conclusion (leads to beliefs/strategies that are most appropriate) i. Expend more cognitive effort in reasoning attend to all information more carefully and process it more deeply (people process information more carefully) 1. 2. Tetlock, 1983, 1985 3. 4. Depends on accuracy-effort trade off ii. Ways to increase this type of motivation: 1. Increase risks of making the wrong conclusion, without increasing rewards for coming up with any specific conclusion a. Tell them that accuracy is most important i. b. Tell them that they will have to justify conclusions to peers i. iii. Ways to detect this type of motivation:
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Unformatted text preview: 1. Less primacy effects a. Kruglanski & Freund, 1983 b. Freund, Kruglanski, & Shpitzajzen, 1985 c. Tetlock, 1983 2. Less stereotyping a. Kruglanski & Freund, 1983 b. Freund, Kruglanski, & Shpitzajzen, 1985 b. Motivation to arrive at a particular, desired conclusion (leads to beliefs/strategies that are most likely to yield the desired conclusion) i. Participants still want to maintain an illusion of objectivity (p. 483), so they will try to gain enough support to be able to justify their conclusions 1. Only pay attention to those things that support their conclusions 2. Motivations make certain information more salient a. Kunda, 1990 3. Motivations make counter-attitudinal evidence seem less valid and reliable a. Lord, Ross, & Lepper, 1979 b. Ditto, Munro, Apanovitch, Scepansky, & Lockhart, 2003...
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course PSC 290 taught by Professor Sherman during the Spring '07 term at UC Davis.

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