AMERICAN SUPREME COURT CASES YOU SHOULD KNOW

AMERICAN SUPREME COURT CASES YOU SHOULD KNOW - Supreme...

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Supreme Court: Marbury v. Madison 1803 - The case arose out of Jefferson's refusal to deliver the commissions to the judges appointed by Adams' Midnight Appointments. One of the appointees, Marbury, sued the Sect. of State, Madison, to obtain his commission. The Supreme Court held that Madison need not deliver the commissions because the Congressional act that had created the new judgships violated the judiciary provisions of the Constitution, and was therefore unconstitutional and void. This case established the Supreme Court's right to judicial review. Chief Justice John Marshall presided. Supreme Court: McCulloch v. Maryland 1819 - This decision upheld the power of Congress to charter a bank as a government agency, and denied the state the power to tax that agency. Supreme Court: Gibbons v. Ogden 1824 - This case ruled that only the federal government has authority over interstate commerce. Munn v. Illinois 1877 - The Supreme Court ruled that an Illinois law that put a ceiling on warehousing rates for grain was a constitutional exercise of the state's power to regulate business. It said that the Interstate Commerce Commission could regulate prices. Civil Rights cases 1883 - These state supreme court cases ruled that Constitutional amendments against discrimination applied only to the federal and state governments, not to individuals or private institutions. Thus the government could not order segregation, but restaurants, hotels, and railroads could. Gave legal sanction to Jim Crow laws. 1886 - Stated that individual states can control trade in their states, but cannot regulate railroads coming through them. Congress has exclusive jurisdiction over interstate commerce. States cannot regulate or place restrictions on businesses which only pass through them, such as interstate transportation. E. C. Knight Company case 1895 - The Supreme Court ruled that since the Knight Company's monopoly over the production of sugar had no direct effect on commerce, the company couldn't be controlled by the government. It also ruled that mining and manufacturing weren't affected by interstate commerce laws and were beyond the regulatory power of Congress. It gave E. C. Knight a legal monopoly because it did not affect trade. Plessy v. Ferguson, "Separate but equal"
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Wormer during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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AMERICAN SUPREME COURT CASES YOU SHOULD KNOW - Supreme...

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