lecture_3

lecture_3 - PS121 Lecture 3 The Middle East in Early Modern...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PS121 Lecture 3 The Middle East in Early Modern History 1. The Uses of History and its Salience in the Middle East 2. Discounting the Pre-Islamic Past as Jahiliyya (the Age of Ignorance) 3. The Exception: Israel Ancient and Modern 4. “Modern” Origins: The Seventh Century (622: Muhammad’s Hijra ) in the Arabian Peninsula; the Qur’an and the Rise of Islam; Shari’a (laws), the Umma (community), and Ijtihad (interpretation) 5. The Early Modern Period Comparing Islam and Western Civilization The Early Caliphate and Dynasties: Umayyad (661-750) and Abbasid (740-1258) The Two Major Sects: Sunni= followers of Sunna or tradition; Shiat Ali (Party of Ali)= Shi’a / Shiites; the Martyrdom of Husayn Ali
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Haram-as-Sharif (the Noble Mount/the Temple Mount); The Dome of the Rock (691) and Al Aqsa Mosque (710-715) 6. Islamic Contributions to Civilization: Science, Mathematics (algebra, from the Arabic for reintegration of broken parts); the algorithm, Medicine, Music (oud/shawm); Ibn Khaldun and history; Maimonides 7. Imperial Extension and Consolidation (11 th through 15 th centuries) Fatimids, Mamluks, Seljuks, Crusaders, and Saladin, Mongols (Jengiz Khan) 8. The Gunpowder Empires: Ottoman, Safavid, Moghal 9. The Dominance of the Ottoman Empire in the Heartland The Paradox of Despotism and Pluralism; the Millet System; Centralization and Decentralization 10. The Incursions of the West and the Fall of the Ottoman Empire (1918) 11. Summing Up: Five Major Developments
Background image of page 2
3 1. The Uses of History and its Salience in the Middle East “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” George Santayana The Middle East is home to many groups other than Arab Muslims, who will be our central focus – including Jews in ancient and modern Israel, and in exile in Arabia, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Turkey; the Kurds who inhabit several countries; Christians (Maronites, Armenians, Copts, Assyrians, and Greek and Roman Catholics); Turks; and Persians. We need to bear them in mind even as we focus on the mainstream of history. It is very important that we study that history, not as historians do, in order to reconstruct it in all its complexity and peculiarity, but to help us understand how it shapes the present. This is why history is important to social scientists. Every social system takes shape and evolves over time. To one degree or another, every society bears the marks of its past. Often, critical periods cast a long shadow, like the French Revolution in Europe or the American Revolution, which resulted in our Declaration of Independence and Constitution, the-documents that set the framework for the country’s political thinking and institutions. Despite the importance of our own founding period, Americans have a built- in cultural bias against history which we need to set aside to appreciate other societies. Henry Ford summed up this cultural bias when he said: “History is bunk.” The U.S. is a comparatively young country. It was born in a revolt against “the Old
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course POLS 121 taught by Professor Lackoff during the Winter '08 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 26

lecture_3 - PS121 Lecture 3 The Middle East in Early Modern...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online