ps121lec11israel

Ps121lec11israel - 1 PS121 Lecture 11 Comparing Regimes(4 continued Democracies Israel 1 Israel as the Middle East's Only Continuously Democratic

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1 PS121 Lecture 11: Comparing Regimes (4 continued): Democracies: Israel 1. Israel as the Middle East’s Only Continuously Democratic Regime: Meeting Robert Dahl’s Criteria—and others 2. Foundations: Declaration of Independence But No Constitution; Instead Basic Laws Passed by the Knesset (Parliament). A Jewish and Democratic State: potential problems and potential changes. Banning the Kach Party. 2. Demography: Population 6.5 million. Divisions: Jews 80%; Arabs (14% Sunni, 3% Christian, 2% Druze) 19 percent; others 1%. Among Jews: Sabras (natives) 39 percent; Ashkenazim (Europeans, including recent immigrants from the former USSR) 36 percent; Sephardim (“Orientals”) 25 percent; 4. Social Structure and Economy: from Agriculture to Industry to High Tech 5. The Multiparty System: A Legacy of the Zionist Movement 6. PR and the Threshold for Seats—Now 2% (compared to 10% in Turkey, 5% in Germany)
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2 7. From One-Party Dominance by Labor (Mapai) to a Rightward Shift to Likud from 1977 8. Portrait of a Divided Electorate: the 1999 Election 9. Strange Bedfellows: The 2001 Election for Prime Minister results in a Likud-Labor Coalition, Ariel Sharon as PM, Shimon Peres as FM 10. The End of the Affair: Dissolution and New Elections in January 2003 11. Religion and Politics: Dilemmas of a Jewish State 12. Israel: A Democracy under Siege but still a model for the region
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3 13. Prospects for Further Democratization in the Middle East This page was last updated on 12 February, 2008
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5 Legend: Definition Field Listing Rank Order Introduction Israel Top of Page Background: Following World War II, the British withdrew from their mandate of Palestine, and the UN partitioned the area into Arab and Jewish states, an arrangement rejected by the Arabs. Subsequently, the Israelis defeated the Arabs in a series of wars without ending the deep tensions between the two sides. The territories Israel occupied since the 1967 war are not included in the Israel country profile, unless otherwise noted. On 25 April 1982, Israel withdrew from the Sinai pursuant to the 1979 Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty. In keeping with the framework established at the Madrid Conference in October 1991, bilateral negotiations were conducted between Israel and Palestinian representatives and Syria to achieve a permanent settlement. Israel and Palestinian officials signed on 13 September 1993 a Declaration of Principles (also known as the "Oslo Accords") guiding an interim period of Palestinian self-rule. Outstanding territorial and other disputes with Jordan were resolved in the 26 October 1994 Israel-Jordan Treaty of Peace. In addition, on 25 May 2000, Israel withdrew unilaterally from southern Lebanon, which it had occupied since 1982. In April 2003, US President BUSH, working in conjunction with the EU, UN, and Russia - the "Quartet" - took the lead in laying out a roadmap to a final settlement of the conflict by 2005, based on reciprocal steps by the two parties leading to two states, Israel and a democratic
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course POLS 121 taught by Professor Lackoff during the Winter '08 term at UCSD.

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Ps121lec11israel - 1 PS121 Lecture 11 Comparing Regimes(4 continued Democracies Israel 1 Israel as the Middle East's Only Continuously Democratic

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