ps121lec9jordanegyptalg

ps121lec9jordanegyptalg - 1 PS121 Lecture 9 Comparing...

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1 PS121 Lecture 9 Comparing Regimes (3) Semi-Authoritarian Monarchies: Jordan, [Morocco], Republics: Algeria, Egypt [Tunisia] 1. Jordan (population 5.5 million) The Hashemite Kingdom (Abdallah; Hussein; Abdallah II) 2. Algeria (population 32 million) “Once the most admired country in the Arab world…People believed it was going to be a success.” Michael Field Independence: the FLN’s Nationalism and Socialism; Disillusionment and the Ruse of the FIS and GIA 1992: The Army Suspends Elections
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2 3. Egypt (population 75 million; 95% lives on 5% of the land area in a narrow strip along the Nile) The Free Officers’ Coup 1952 Abdel Gamal Nasser’s Pan-Arab Nationalism and “Arab Socialism” The Challenge of the Muslim Brotherhood and Jihadi Groups Anwar Sadat and Hosni Mubarak: Stability, Repression, and Economic Stagnation 4. Democratization and the Islamist Movements: “One Man, One Vote, One Time”—or the Moderation That Comes with Responsibility?
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3 These three countries differ in many ways but politically they share a common type of regime and face a common problem: all have authoritarian regimes which must deal with major opposition forces, and in all three cases, the strongest focus of opposition is Islamist. If they allow dissent (as they must to prevent conspiracy), they open the door to what could become a more inclusive (and therefore more stable) political system or a new form of authoritarianism on the Islamist model. It is a hard dilemma for all three regimes. This page was last updated on 19 October, 2004
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4 Legend: Definition Field Listing Rank Order Introduction Jordan Top of Page Background: For most of its history since independence from British administration in 1946, Jordan was ruled by King HUSSEIN (1953-99). A pragmatic ruler, he successfully navigated competing pressures from the major powers (US, USSR, and UK), various Arab states, Israel, and a large internal Palestinian population, despite several wars and coup attempts. In 1989 he reinstituted parliamentary elections and gradually political liberalization; in 1994 he signed a formal peace treaty with Israel. King ABDALLAH II - the eldest son of King HUSSEIN and Princess MUNA - assumed the throne following his father's death in February 1999. Since then, he has consolidated his power and undertaken an aggressive economic reform program. Jordan acceded to the World Trade Organization in 2000, and began to participate in the European Free Trade Association in 2001. After a two-year delay, parliamentary and municipal elections took place in the summer of 2003. The prime minister and government appointed in October 2003 declared their commitment to accelerated economic and political reforms and the new cabinet includes an unprecedented three women as ministers.
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5 Jordan is a monarchy, now under King Abdallah II. As “the Emirate of Transjordan” it was founded in 1921 by the British to compensate the Hashemites after they had been defeated for control of Syria. “Emirate” because the first King
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ps121lec9jordanegyptalg - 1 PS121 Lecture 9 Comparing...

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