ps121lec12zionism

ps121lec12zionism - 1 Zionism: European Colonization or...

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1 Zionism: European Colonization or Return Home? 1. The two narratives 2. The Five Phases of the Conflict 3. A Pragmatic Perspective 4. Zionism and the Jewish—and Christian and Muslim-- Historical and Religious Memory 5. Modern Secular Zionism as an Excistential Response to “the Jewish Question” 6. Anticipations of Zionism 7. Emancipation, Assimilation, and Enlightenment: Promises Unfulfilled 8. The Pogroms in Czarist Russia (1880s-1905): Slavophilism and Rejection in Eastern Europe 9. Anti-Semitism: The Dreyfus case in France and “La France Juive” 10. The Emergence of Modern Secular Zionism 11. Strands in Zionism: Cultural (Ahad Ha’am) Political (Theodor Herzl)
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2 Religious (Mizrachi=Merkaz Ruchani) Labor (Poalei Zion> Mapai, Mapam>Labor) Revisionism: Vladimir Jabotinsky (New Zionist Organization>Betar> Cherut> Likud) 12. Other Options for Jews: Assimilation; Persistence; Socialism; Emigration (chiefly to the U.S.) 13. Re-Creating Nationhood: Language and Settlement Jewish Settlement: In 1881, Jewish population 25,000 plus; Arab population 470,000; in 1914: 85,000 Jews, 500,000 Arabs; by 1936: Jewish population 375,000; Arab population 960,000. By 1945: Jewish population 560,000; Arab population 1.3 million. 14. Action and Reaction: The Rise of Palestinian Nationalism and Resistance to Zionism under Ottoman Rule: The Clash of National Identities 1. The Two Narratives According to most Arabs, Jewish settlement in Palestine was another example of European colonialism. The result, they say, is that most of the native population was uprooted from its ancestral land and denied the right to self-determination. Although the largest Arab country, Egypt, signed a peace treaty recognizing Israel in 1979, until the Oslo Accords of 1993 Arabs generally refused to accept the right of Jews to a homeland in Palestine. In that year the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), the recognized umbrella organization of most Palestinian Arab factions, formally renounced “armed struggle” in favor of diplomacy and agreed to a partition— something Arabs had bitterly refused until then. With Israel’s agreement, a Palestinian Authority was created in parts of the West Bank and Gaza and about 40% of the territory was put under the PA’s civil control—excluding Jewish settlements. In 2000, at Camp David and afterward, PA Chairman Yassir Arafat turned down a US proposal that would have given Palestinians statehood in all of Gaza, about 95-97 percent of the territories (plus compensation in Israeli territory) and administrative control over the Arab neighborhoods of Jerusalem. He demanded a complete return
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3 to the 1967 borders and recognition of the right of all Palestinian refugees to choose between repatriation to what is now Israel and compensation. Palestinians are divided. Some accept the need for partition. Others—notably the Islamist
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ps121lec12zionism - 1 Zionism: European Colonization or...

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