ps121lec13britmandate

ps121lec13britmandate - 1 PS 121 Lecture 13 From the...

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1 PS 121 Lecture 13 From the Balfour Declaration to the White Paper of 1939 and the UN Partition Resolution of 1947 1 A Promise to Arabs: the Sherif Hussein-McMahon Correspondence (1915) 2 Britain and France Strike a Deal: Sykes-Picot (1916) 3. “the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people”: the Balfour Declaration (1917) 4 Weizmann and the Emir Faisal: What Might Have Been “No true Arab can be suspicious or afraid of Jewish nationalism…We are demanding Arab freedom, and we should show ourselves unworthy of it, if we did not now, as I do, say to the Jews—welcome back home—and cooperate with them to the limit of the Arab State.” (Emir Feisal, 1918) 5 The League of Nations Mandate (1920) 6 Transjordan is Created, Removing it from Palestine (1922), and the Mandate is Revised 7 The “Yishuv” Organizes; PR, Labor Party Dominance, and the Histadrut; the Arabs Refuse to Take Part in British-Sponsored Government 8 Brith Shalom and Binationalism: A Failed Attempt at Jewish- Arab Cooperation 9 Arab Protests (1921 and 1929) and the British Retreat
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2 10 The Arab Revolt (1936-39) and the Arab High Command under Haj Amin al-Husseini 11 The Peel Commission Proposes Partition (1936-1937); Rejected by Arabs 12 The British White paper of 1939: Reversing Balfour 13 Palestine in World War II 14 After the War: British Policy in the Region and in Palestine; the Formation of the Arab League; the Jewish “DPs” 15 The Anglo-American Commission of Inquiry is appointed 16 Followed by the UN Special Commission on Palestine (1947) 17 The UN Votes for Partition and the State of Israel is Established (1947-48) During World War I, the British decided that they could get help defeating the Turks by organizing support among the groups under Ottoman control. They therefore began negotiations with the Emir Abdullah, eldest son of Sherif Hussein, head of the Hashemite tribe of Mecca. There was an exchange of letters in 1915 that came to be called the (Sir Henry) McMahon-Hussein letters. They included a British promise “to recognize and support the independence of the Arabs in all the regions within the limits demanded by the Sherif”—namely the “Arab rectangle,” including Syria, Arabia, and Mesopotamia—with the exception of those “portions of Syria lying to the west of the districts of Damascus, Homs, Hama, and Aleppo.” In exchange, Sherif Hussein pledged support for the British military campaign.
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3 On this basis began the “Arab Revolt” in June 1916. Under Hussein’s second son, Emir Feisal, and with the help of the British officer Col. T.E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia). Between 10,000 and 20,000 Arab irregulars played an important role in the campaign. In the exchange of letters, McMahon made clear that “western Syria” (now
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ps121lec13britmandate - 1 PS 121 Lecture 13 From the...

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