ps121lec17usforpol

ps121lec17usforpol - 1 Lecture 17: US Foreign Policy in the...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Lecture 17: US Foreign Policy in the Middle East 1. Myths and Half-Truths The US as Imperial Power The US as Pro-Israeli, anti-Palestinian 2. Realism and Idealism in U.S. Foreign Policy; Their Interplay in U.S. Policy in the Middle East The combination of both approaches in US foreign policy in the Middle Eastand the importance of accident and leadership 3. From Isolation in the 18 th and 19 th centuries to Global Superpower in the 20 th Century Steer clear of permanent alliances, with any portion of the foreign world. (Washington) Avoid foreign entanglements (Jefferson) The Monroe Doctrine (1823) War with Mexico and Manifest Destiny (1840s) 2 Missionary Liberalism and Imperialism: Cuba, The Philippines and Latin America (1898- 1930s) World War I: Advance and Retreat World War II: The US Becomes a World Power Permanently Learning from Experience: the Marshall Plan, NATO, and Rebuilding Japan The Cold War: Containment in Europe and the Third World 4. Into the Middle East Maelstrom: The End of Anglo-American Empire and the Onset of the Cold War 5. Objectives from the 1950s to 1990: Contain the USSR and Block Radicalism; Support Israel While Trying to Mediate the Arab-Israeli Conflict; Protect Access to Oil 6. The Means: Diplomacy, Tolerance for Nationalization of Oil Industry, Arms Supplies, Covert Operations, Economic Assistance, Promote Free Markets 3 7. The End of the Cold War and A New American Role in the Region: Collective Security or Pax Americana? 8. The Challenge of Islamism in Iran and the New Threat of Islamist Terrorism with a Global Reach 9. Overthrowing Saddam Husseinand the Prospects for Iraq 10. The Israeli-Arab Conflict: Will the Road Map Lead Somewhere? 11. In Our Interest and for Our Values: The U.S. Role in Helping to Create a Better and More Stable World Order: Democratization, Economic Progress, Ethnic Pluralism, and Religious Toleration 4 Myths and Half-truths about US foreign policy 1. It is said by critics that the US is an imperialist power and that its biggest interest in the Middle East is controlling the oil of the region. Well, we certainly are the worlds one remaining superpower, which means that we have interests to protect in many parts of the world and the means to protect those interests. We also use military bases in strategic locations in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. But it is a great exaggeration to compare this important and far-flung role to the imperialism the world knew under the Roman Empire, under the various Muslim empires, including the Ottoman, and during the age of European imperialism. Imperialism means nothing if it does not involve the creation of territorial control and colonization by the extension of sovereignty. It is unimaginable, for example, that the Rome of the Caesars would have stood for the guff from the Gauls and Goths that we take from France and Germany. They would have simply sent in their legions. It would have been inconceivable for the Romans have simply sent in their legions....
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course POLS 121 taught by Professor Lackoff during the Winter '08 term at UCSD.

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ps121lec17usforpol - 1 Lecture 17: US Foreign Policy in the...

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