his115_r3_appendix_c_outcomes_of_revolution - Appendix C...

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Appendix C HIS/115 Version 3 1 Associate Level Material Appendix C Outcomes of the Revolution Part 1 Complete the grid by describing each military event and explaining its relationship to the outcome of the Revolutionary War. Military Event Description Relationship to the Outcome of the Revolutionary War Concord and Lexington “By the spring of 1775, tensions were at a fever pitch. Feeling threatened, the British secretary of state pressured Gage to curb the colonists’ military planning. So, in April 1775, Gage sent troops to the town of Concord, about 20 miles northwest of Boston, to capture the colonial military supplies hidden there and to arrest the patriot leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams. The British soldiers were thus armed and resolute when they left Boston on April 18, 1775. Despite the soldiers’ efforts to move quietly, Boston patriots detected the troop movement and sent Paul Revere, William Dawes, and Samuel Prescott on horseback to alert the colonists in the countryside between Boston and Concord (only Prescott made it all the way to Concord; the others “This was the first time Americans had fired against the British Army (colloquially referred to as the Redcoats) in a formal confrontation. It was also the first time the Redcoats had been forced to retreat in the face of an American enemy. The Minutemen made the Redcoats’ return to Boston a nightmare. Militiamen gathered from surrounding towns to pursue the British the entire way, firing from behind stone walls and trees. The British suffered heavy casualties and, once in Boston, found themselves besieged by thousands more militiamen. Over the course of the day, the Americans suffered 95 casualties, while the British suffered 273, including 73 dead. This was a marked escalation of the colonial conflict; for the first time, Americans had killed British soldiers in battle.” (K.Schultz, University of Phoenix , n.d., p. 95). This also told the British that the Americans
Appendix C HIS/115 Version 3 2 were captured on the way). On the morning of April 19, a militia assembled in Lexington to halt the British before they reached Concord. The British, still the most powerful army in the world at the time, did not back down. The American militia captain ordered his men (called “Minutemen” because they supposedly were ready on a minute’s notice) to retreat after the much stronger British forces ordered them to disperse. As some of the rebelling colonists retreated, someone fired a shot (both sides later claimed the other fired first), and the British soldiers began firing on the militia. The colonists suffered eighteen casualties (eight killed and ten wounded), while the British suffered only one, after this, the supposed “shot heard ’round the world.” After the British rout of the Minutemen, the British marched to Concord, but by the time they arrived, Hancock and Adams had fled, and it is uncertain whether the cautious British would have exacerbated the already explosive situation by carrying out the capture of these two prominent colonists. Instead, when they took their

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