FBI - Analysis of the Federal Bureau of Investigation History of Federal Bureau of Investigation The Federal Bureau of Investigation(FBI which stems

FBI - Analysis of the Federal Bureau of Investigation...

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Analysis of the Federal Bureau of Investigation History of Federal Bureau of Investigation The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) which stems from the Department of Justice was founded by Attorney General Charles Bonaparte in 1908. It was originally called “special agent force” and was not until March 22, 1935, was the name changed to what the world knows today as the FBI (FBI, 2014). During the agency’s early days, it was made up of a few corps special agents (who were former detectives and secret service men) who had the authority to cross state boundaries and handle foreign affairs (FBI, 2014). This was very controversial and unheard of during that time and would later prove to be one of the key functions of the FBI. During those days the state held the power and eventually a transfer of power would be shifted to the federal government. During the formation of the FBI, law enforcement was tied heavily in politics and not professionalism. President Roosevelt believed that a person’s efficiency and expertise and not their political connections, should determine who best to serve in government. It was this belief that Attorney General Charles Bonaparte shared with President Roosevelt that led to his appointment as the head of the FBI (FBI, 2014). The FBI primarily investigated violations of laws involving national banking, bankruptcy, naturalization, antitrust, peonage, and land fraud. On June of 1910, the Mann Act was passed making it illegal to transport women across state lines for immoral use (FBI, 2014). This set the foundation for the FBI to be able to investigate criminals who evade state laws with no other federal violations. As the years progressed and World War I took rampage across the country, the FBI was now faced with espionage, selective service and Sabotage Acts and also heavily assisted the Department of Labor. As their responsibilities and employee base increased, their mission and goals became clearer. The mission of the FBI is to protect and defend the United States
against foreign intelligence and terrorist threats and attacks, to enforce and uphold the criminal laws of the United States, and to provide criminal justice services and leadership to federal, state, municipal, and international agencies and partners (FBI, 2014). Today there are 56 field offices who take on the eight major categories the FBI tackles (Starling, 2012). The FBI investigates terrorism, counterintelligence, cyber-crime, public corruption, civil rights, organized crime, white collar crime and violent crime and major theft (FBI, 2014). The FBI assists police agencies

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