ECON DEVELOPMENT - TABLE OF CONTENTS Part I:History of Economic Development Administration.4 Part II:Organizational Design.5 Part III:Assessment of

ECON DEVELOPMENT - TABLE OF CONTENTS Part I:History of...

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Part I:History of Economic Development Administration………………………...4 Part II:Organizational Design….………………………………………….……….5 Part III:Assessment of Organizational Design...…………………………...………6 Part IV: Evaluation of Planning and Implementation………..……………………7 Part V: Recommendations for Planning and Implementation……………………..8 Part VI:Administrative Ethics……………………………...……………………..…9 Part VII:Leadership Influences….…………………………………………...…….10 Part VIII:Legal Decisions…………………… ...... …………………………………11 Part IX: Strategies for Consideration to Administrative Processes…..……………12 Part X: Recommendations for Improvements to Administrative Processes …...…13 Part XI:Human Resource Processes………………………...……………...……..14 Part XII: Implications of Human Resource Workforce…………………………..15 Part XIII: Succession Planning for Human Resource Management……………16 Part XIV: Job Analysis and Design………………………………….…..………..17 Part XV:Budget Overview………………………...………………..…….……….……18 Part XVI: Budgeting Assesment…………………………………………….….……..20
Part XVII: Analysis of Budgeting Plans and Actual Expenditures.…….… ..... ……..21 Part XVIII: Implications of Foreign Policy……………..…..………………...…..….22 Part XIX: Budget Request and Recommendations………………….……….……….23 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………..23 References
History of Economic Development Agency: The Economic Development Administration (EDA) was formed with the mission “To Lead the federal economic agenda by promoting innovation and competitiveness, preparing American regions for growth and success in the worldwide economy” 1 . President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the first to focus programming on economic development through his New Deal programs. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy, signed the Area Redevelopment Act (ARA), which established within the Department of Commerce, direct loans to rural and urban depressed areas, the grant also offered technical and retraining assistance grants for individuals to build skills that would result in life-long employment opportunities. While admirable in theory, the ARA failed to reduce unemployment in depressed areas 2 . In 1965 Congress replaced the ARA with the EDA in the Public Works and Economic Development Act (PWEDA). The EDA did much of the same work as the ARA, supplying infrastructure development to high-unemployment areas, and working with communities to generate and retain jobs 2 . In 1971 President Richard Nixon gave additional authority to the EDA in creating the Publics Works Impact Program (PWIP), which was aimed at areas with short-term countercyclical employment. Nixon also

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