Animal cloing - QUIETLY ANIMAL CLONING SPEEDS ONWARD By Kris Axtman | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor COLLEGE STATION TEXAS They are

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QUIETLY, ANIMAL CLONING SPEEDS  ONWARD By Kris Axtman | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS - They are Big Bertha and Tiny Tina, a couple of piglets. They may look and act differently (hence, their names), but these oinkers are identical. They are the newest cloned animals from Texas A&M University, which - with their births - leads the academic pack in the number of species cloned. And the fact that animals with the exact same genes can be different sizes and have different character traits may be just the first of many things that scientists hope can be learned from these little pigs. This latest cloning project - and the wealth of information scientists hope it will provide - is just one of the many such animal-cloning experiments under way. Even as the human- cloning debate has dominated headlines and congressional hearings, scientists have cloned everything from mice to lambs to bulls. And it is in the pens of these cloned animals - rather than the theoretical realm - where both the advances and problems of cloning are being played out. After the 1996 birth of Dolly the sheep, the first cloned animal, the technology has been galloping along. There are now cows and goats that produce more milk and tastier meat, bulls able to resist disease, and pigs that can act as organ donors. And this is only the beginning, say cloning supporters. For instance, breeding disease-
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course AGR 236 taught by Professor Rachowitz during the Spring '08 term at Sam Houston State University.

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Animal cloing - QUIETLY ANIMAL CLONING SPEEDS ONWARD By Kris Axtman | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor COLLEGE STATION TEXAS They are

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