Horse%20Slaughter%20Paper

Horse Slaughter - THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF A BAN ON THE HUMANE SLAUGHTER(PROCESSING OF HORSES IN THE UNITED STATES James J Ahern Ph.D

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Copyright © 2006 by Animal Welfare Council, Inc. THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF A BAN ON THE HUMANE SLAUGHTER (PROCESSING) OF HORSES IN THE UNITED STATES James J. Ahern, Ph.D. Agribusiness Department, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, California David P. Anderson, Ph.D. Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas DeeVon Bailey, Ph.D. Department of Economics, Utah State University, Logan, Utah Lance A. Baker, Ph.D. Department of Animal Sciences, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, Texas W. Arden Colette, Ph.D. Department of Agricultural Economics, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, Texas J. Shannon Neibergs, Ph.D. Department of Equine Business, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky Michael S. North, MBA Department of Economics, Utah State University, Logan, Utah Gary D. Potter, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Department of Animal Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Carolyn L. Stull, Ph.D. Veterinary Medicine Extension, University of California, Davis, California Prepared for the: Animal Welfare Council, Inc. Colorado Springs, Colorado www.animalwelfarecouncil.org May 15, 2006
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Copyright © 2006 by Animal Welfare Council, Inc. 2 Executive Summary Federal legislation has been proposed to amend the Horse Protection Act to prohibit the shipping, transporting, moving, delivering, receiving, possessing, purchasing, selling, or donation of horses and other equines to be humanely slaughtered (processed) for human consumption, and for other purposes. The intent of the legislation is to enact a ban in the United States on processing horses for human consumption. The legislation does not provide fiscal support that would likely be needed to respond to an ever increasing number of unwanted, neglected, and abused horses. Often times horse neglect and abuse cases originate from a lack of economic resources needed to adequately maintain a horse’s health. While everyone fully supports and is committed to the humane treatment of all horses, there are unintended consequences of banning horse processing. The purpose of this paper is to identify and review the unintended consequences of a ban in the United States on the processing of horses for human consumption: 1. The potential for a large number of abandoned or unwanted horses is substantial. 2. Public animal rescue facilities are currently saturated with unwanted horses. No funding has been allocated to manage a large increase in horses that will likely become the responsibility of these facilities. 3. Cost of maintaining unwanted horses accumulates over time: ± A conservative estimate of the total cost of caring for unwanted horses, based upon 2005 statistics, is $220 million; ± Cumulative annual maintenance costs of otherwise processed horses, since the year 2000, would have exceeded more than $513 million in 2005. 4.
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course AGR 236 taught by Professor Rachowitz during the Spring '08 term at Sam Houston State University.

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Horse Slaughter - THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF A BAN ON THE HUMANE SLAUGHTER(PROCESSING OF HORSES IN THE UNITED STATES James J Ahern Ph.D

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