german worker and karl marx

german worker and karl marx - The Nineteenth Century German...

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The Nineteenth Century German Worker and Karl Marx Karl Marx, in his “Communist Manifesto,” describes the relationship between the bourgeoisie and the proletariat as “two great hostile camps.” 1 In late nineteenth century Germany, the bourgeois class underpaid, overworked, and exploited the proletariat class. Regardless of sex or age, the German worker often had to work around twelve hour a day. The workers were so underpaid that they had to send their children to work at a very early age in able to support the family. The working conditions in factories and mines were terrible and the workers were treated more like “instruments of labour” 2 than actual humans. In the “Communist Manifesto,” Karl Marx advices that the proletarians need to become unified and take control of society. They then should eliminate private property and the entire class system. 3 The German proletarian, as shown through autobiographies in Alfred Kelly’s The German Worker , have similar beliefs to Karl Marx but are not as extreme. The workers believe that they are being exploited by the bourgeoisie and that they must join unions to help bring an end to the exploitation. They do not, however, suggest the communist ideas Karl Marx presents in his “Communist Manifesto.” The late nineteenth century German proletariat worked in terrible conditions regardless of age or sex. In the Industrial Age, Karl Marx states that “differences of age and sex have no longer any distinctive social validity for the working class. All are 1 “Manifesto of the Communist Party,” http://www.marx.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist- manifesto/index.htm (accessed on February 27, 2006). 2 “Manifesto of the Communist Party,” http://www.marx.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist- manifesto/index.htm (accessed on February 27, 2006). 3 “Manifesto of the Communist Party,” http://www.marx.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist- manifesto/index.htm (accessed on February 27, 2006).
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instruments of labour, more or less expensive to use, according to their age and sex.” 4 In The German Worker , autobiographies from workers show that children had to work as early as seven years old 5 and were often required to work for at least twelve hours in a day. 6
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german worker and karl marx - The Nineteenth Century German...

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