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ottoman food - Food in the Ottoman Empire The quality of...

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Food in the Ottoman Empire The quality of food and availability of food groups differed greatly between the upper and lower class, as well as the different areas in the Ottoman Empire. The difference of the cost of food was determined by their availability in the area and the amount of preparation the product required. Habitats of the countryside and poor areas of town usually ate just bread and soup, while janissaries and members of the palace were able to eat more luxurious foods. 1 Meat was very uncommon for the lower class and fish, while abundant in towns and cities (especially Istanbul) around sea ports, was rare in the countryside. 2 According to price lists in Ottoman archives in Istanbul, the twelve most consumed foods were flour, rice, honey, cooking oil, mutton, chick peas, lentils, onions, eggs, sugar, coffee, and olive oil with sugar and coffee made only readily available to the palace. Flour, rice, cooking oil, olive oil, and mutton were the most frequently purchased.
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