Himala - Copy - RICKY LEE HIMALA Ricardo Ricky Lee Born...

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RICKY LEE HIMALA
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Ricardo “Ricky” Lee Born on March 19, 1948 (66 y/o) Filipino writer & scriptwriter Grew up with his relatives in Daet, Camarines Norte Ricky’s mother died when he was 5 and he only saw his father on few occassions. It was said that Lee often sneaks into movie houses and bury himself in books at the school library, tearing away pages with striking images. Intelligent student His promising writing career took a first step when he won his first national literary award for a short story he wrote when he was still in high school.
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Driven by his passion to pursue his dreams, he ran away from home and took a bus to Manila. Though Lee found “freedom”. He was on his own, but he was homeless and hungry , moving from job to job. (waiter, vendor, tutor, accounting clerk, etc.) He was accepted at University of the Philippines Diliman as an AB English Major. He never got his diploma from U.P . Lee poured out his life as an orphan chafing to break away from the constraints of guardians and the intolerance of a small town, and gave life to characters whose confinement and deprivation replicated his experience of life in Daet and of his early days in Manila.
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Ricky Lee had been winning literary prizes, and a circle of writing friends was beginning to revolve around him. He had by this time earned a reputation as “The Bikolano Chinese majoring in AB English but writing in Tagalog.“ He had in the meantime found employment as a journalist in the Philippines Free Press and in his work, he easily gravitated towards the activist movement. The national democratic writers' organization PAKSA (Pen for the People's Progress)  He lived as a fugitive during the  Martial Law  years and was later incarcerated.
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The declaration of Martial Law in 1972 and the accompanying clampdown on media lost Lee his job of newspapering. The movie industry found it easy to put up with the regime's restrictions and was beginning to grind out its usual entertainment for the masses . It was then that Lee, to earn a living, tried his hand at writing a movie script. Then in January 1974, Lee fell victim to a wave of military arrests in Metro Manila and was imprisoned in Fort Bonifacio for the greater part of the year.
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Lee has confessed that "Himala” (1982) is his most personal screenplay in which he invested so much of himself - politics, ideals, doubts, visions and repressed childhood memories. In his notes on the writing of the script, Lee has pointed out "Himala" was a screenplay in which he made the fewest concessions . The material originated with me, not with any producer. "Himala" was about art and reality, faith and doubt, flesh and spirituality, truly a masterpiece that can be claimed equally by both Lee and Bernal.
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