PHL301 Plato Notes - PHL301 Plato I. Philosophy begins with...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PHL301 – Plato I. Philosophy begins with wonder about the world… What is real? a. Often tied with science b. i. Metaphysics – what is there? What is it? 1. Is there a God? What am I? 2. Fundamental abstractions on concrete subject 3. ii. Epistemology – What can I know? 1. Knowledge versus believe 2. Linked to metaphysics through need for proof iii. Ethics – value… What should I do? 1. With respect to human conduct 2. Theory of Value c. Philosophies “of” (i.e. Philosophy of Science, Business Ethics, etc.) d. Logic i. Argument = premises conclusion ii. Deduction vs. Induction 1. Deductive reasoning – if premises are true, conclusion is true (conclusion follows premises), necessity 2. Inductive reasoning – based on repetitive experience, probability iii. Deductive validity sound argument (if premises are valid, then the argument is sound) iv. Logical fallacy – bad/invalid argument
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. Begging the question – premises just as controversial as conclusion (assuming what one’s trying to prove is correct, conclusions w/in premises) 2. Appeal to ignorance – arguing that the opposite of the conclusion hasn’t been proven 3. Suppression of evidence – omitting important corollary information to premises and/or conclusion 4. Ad hominem – “against the man,” attacking the arguer 5. Appeal to authority – using authority figure to support argument 6. Appeal to the crowd – everyone else/most people believe/agree w/ argument v. Logical Laws 1. Noncontradiction – statement cannot be true AND false at the same time 2. Excluded middle vi. Reducing to absurdity 1. Problem of evil – everything God creates is good, but a devil exists 2. Liar’s paradox – all Cretans are liars (spoken by a Cretan) 3. Absolute skepticism – knowing one knows nothing vii. The limits of reason/deduction 1. Infinite regress of premises – proving premises by deduction (proving premises of premises of premises, etc.) 2. Primary premises obtained by induction (possibility of being incorrect) II. Plato a. i. Has no writing ii. Interested in ordinary affairs iii. Attempted to draw attention to abstractions
Background image of page 2
iv. Took part in military service, where he distinguished himself
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course PHL 301 taught by Professor Bonevac during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 8

PHL301 Plato Notes - PHL301 Plato I. Philosophy begins with...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online