Joyas Voladoras 4 - EWRT 1A A Heart-To-Heart with Joyas Voladoras Brian Doyle wrote a poetic piece called Joyas Voladoras which is laced with hidden

Joyas Voladoras 4 - EWRT 1A A Heart-To-Heart with Joyas...

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December 10, 2012EWRT 1AA Heart-To-Heart with “Joyas VoladorasBrian Doyle wrote a poetic piece called “Joyas Voladoras”, which is laced with hidden messages through the use of his metaphors, similes, and symbolism. The general meaning is left for interpretation uniquely by each reader who comes across it, and the details so heavy, that one who reads it is instantly able to draw a deeper meaning which coincides with whatever life lesson speaks most to them. For the analysis I personally came up with, I was able to infer a life lesson within all of the poetic devices used. Doyle's first, long, inferable metaphor using the hummingbird as a fast paced, short lived, small-hearted creature, then moving on to a summary of the whale, who, in contrast, is a large, proportionally slower moving creature, with a literally gargantuan heart, using the gift as a giant sponge to enjoy a slow paced life, cherishing every moment, but it leaves no significant markers of its presence behind as a representation of its life, is a key what the author is outlining.There comes two choices in how a life will play out based on action, where the life can be spent as a whole unit to produce something great, like a hummingbird, or it can be lived moment to moment, only focusing on the significance of yourself, like the great blue whale [parallel antithesis].The last paragraph is one ofthe most beautiful–and heart-wrenching–paragraphs that I’ve read in all of literature. It literally knocks the breath out of you. It is a clear summary for how all of this talk about animals is actually meant for us human beings, us homosapien sapiens, man twice wise, to learn from the lives of one of the smallest creatures, and from the life of the most massive of creatures.As a light source which Doyle uses to inform the reader that this whole essay is not just about the size of the heart, he includes a short section of insight, one which I find to be the revealing text the essay would fail without.Every creature on earth has approximately two billion heartbeats to spend in a lifetime. You can spend them slowly, like a tortoise and live to be two hundred years old, or you can spend them
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fast, like a hummingbird, and live to be two years old (Doyle, 168).This specific quote is actually one long, drawn out use of symbolism. In this case, the symbols are numbers; quantitive signaling used expertly as a poetic medium. The underlying meaning behind this passage is not to be taken directly. Of course, you cannot choose how you want to spend your heartbeats; each living being is born with a specific natural heartbeat, which is inherited from the parents, and from the ancestors over billions of years of evolution. Generally, the smaller the creature, the faster the heart rate. And once again, one cannot choose their size. The “fast” heartbeat belonging tothe one who lives for only two years is a display of someone who takes every moment and opportunity they can. They live everyday like it's their last. This is the life which will end early, because each
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