Chardonnay - Chardonnay Chardonnay varietal wines are among...

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Chardonnay Chardonnay varietal wines are among the most popular white wines. Part of the attraction of Chardonnay, for wine makers and lovers alike, is its versatility. In the U.S., it is often made using full malolactic fermentation to soften the acidity and some oak handling. Without oak, Chardonnay generally produces a soft wine, often with fruity flavors. When aged with oak, Chardonnay can acquire a smokey, vanilla, caramel, and butter aroma. Major Growing regions France: Chablis (most acidity), Cote de beaune (fleshy) , Cote Chalonnaise (moderate acidity), Maconnais (moderate acidity) California : Mendocino (crisp, high acid), Napa (high alcohol), Sonoma, Carneros, monterey, San Louis Obispo, Santa Barbara Washington: (not known for chardonnay, medium acid, good fruit) Oregon (tart wines, low alcohol, high acidity) New York (high in acidity) Italy (light wines with good acidity) Australia- (sometimes blended with Semillon) New Zealand Flavors and Characteristics
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Chardonnay - Chardonnay Chardonnay varietal wines are among...

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