Final Paper - Homayoonieh 1 Shima Homayoonieh Professor...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Homayoonieh Shima Homayoonieh Professor Brey BME 301 Final Paper Ceramics vs. Polymers for Bone Tissue Engineering In the recent years a huge shift occurred from bio-stable materials to biodegradable materials for medical applications. A biomaterial can be defined as a material intended to interface with biological system to evaluate, treat or replace any organ or function in the body. The essential requirement for a material to be identified as biomaterial is its biocompatibility, which is its ability to perform with an appropriate chemical, physical or biological host response in a specific application. [ CITATION Lak07 \l 1033 ] Although the physical, chemical and biological response of biodegradable polymers/bioceramics varies with the time and degradation products, they satisfy the above prerequisites to some degree. Preferably the biomaterial used in the body should have the following properties: The degradation products should be nontoxic, and able to be processed and cleared from the body, the polymers should have fitting mechanical properties for the indicated application and the properties should be adjustable, appropriate permeability and process ability for the intended application. Ceramics, glasses and glass– ceramics are emerging for use in the medical field, which are grouped together as bioceramics. They have gradually gained their recognition and some of them are now accepted as viable biomaterials for tissue substitution and bone applications. Bioceramics have the advantage of being compatible with the human body environment. Their composition, mostly ions commonly found in the physiological environment (such as Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, Na+, etc.) results in their biocompatibility.[ CITATION Lak07 \l 1033 ] The emergence of bioactive ceramics which include calcium phosphates (with hydroxyapatite being the prominent family member), Bioglasss, and other bioactive glasses and 1
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Homayoonieh glass–ceramics that produce a specific biological response at the interface of the material resulting in the formation of a strong bond between the tissue and the material One of the best materials is calcium phosphate, especially hydroxyapatite (HA) since their condition mimic natural bone composition. HA possesses excellent biocompatibility and is osteoconductive. It has been used clinically on its own as a bioactive material in the form of powder, porous structure, or dense body. The promoted success of HA is its use as a bioactive coating on total hip prostheses. HA is a weak bioceramics and thus cannot be used on its own as major load-bearing implant in the human body. [CITATION Aok94 \l 1033 ] Bioglasss is also bioactive bioceramic that have been successfully used for tissue replacement. Bioglasss is a family of bioactive glasses that contain SiO2, Na2O, CaO and P2O5 in specific proportions. A particular advantage of Bioglasss (45S5 Bioglasss) is its ability to bond to both hard and soft tissues .The primary shortcoming of Bioglasss is mechanical weakness and low fracture toughness. Bioactive glasses meet the criteria such as excellent osteoconductivity
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern