1119982326277_Gobezie_mf_food_security_impact - Theoretical...

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Macroeconomics: Principles & Policy
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 1
Macroeconomics: Principles & Policy
Baumol/Blinder
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Theoretical Perspectives on Gender and Development Edited by Jane L. Parpart,
M. Patricia Connelly,
andV. Eudine Barriteau Published by the International Development Research CentrePO Box 8500, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1G 3H9 © Commonwealth of Learning 2000 Legal deposit: 2nd quarter 2000National Library of CanadaISBN 0-88936-910-0 The views expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the International Development Research Centre. Mention of a proprietary name does not constitute endorsement of the product and is given only for information. A microfiche edition is available. The catalogue of IDRC Books and this publication may be consulted online at . CONTENTS
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Macroeconomics: Principles & Policy
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 1
Macroeconomics: Principles & Policy
Baumol/Blinder
Expert Verified
Foreword Anneli Alba Preface Jane L. Parpart, M. Patricia Connelly, and V. Eudine Ba Acknowledgments Chapter 1 Why Theory? Barbara Bailey, Elsa Leo-Rhynie, and Jeanette Morris Chapter 2 Why Gender? Why Development? Rhoda Reddock Chapter 3 Feminism and Development: Theoretical Pers M. Patricia Connelly, Tania Murray Li, Martha MacDona Chapter 4 Feminist Theory and Development: Implicatio V. Eudine Barriteau Chapter 5 Alternative Approaches to Women and Develo Maxine McClean Chapter 6 The Women's Movement and Its Role in Devel Anne S. Walker Appendix 1 Key Concepts Appendix 2 Acronyms and Abbreviations Appendix 3 Contributing Authors
F OREWORD The development debate has advanced considerably since the United Nation's First Development Decade in the 1960s, which emphasized economic growth and the "trickle- down" approach as key to reducing poverty. One of the notable advancements in the debate has been the move to consider gender equality as a key element of development. Women's concerns were first integrated into the development agenda in the 1970s. Disappointment over the trickle-down approach paved the way for the adoption of the basic-needs strategy, which focused on increasing the participation in and benefits of the development process for the poor, as well as recognizing women's needs and contributions to society. Activists articulated women's issues in national and international forums. Following these events, the women-in-development movement endorsed the enhancement of women's consciousness and abilities, with a view to enabling women to examine their situations and to act to correct their disadvantaged positions. The movement also affirmed that giving women greater access to resources would contribute to an equitable and efficient development process. The end of the 1970s ushered in the concern with gender relations in development. Microlevel studies drew our attention to the differences in entitlements, perceived capabilities, and social expectations of men and women, boys and girls.

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