E294SU2015SyllabusSchedule (1)

E294SU2015SyllabusSchedule (1) - SURVEY OF AMERICAN...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865 St. Joseph’s College of New York Patchogue, NY 11772 English 294, Section 1 Summer Semester, 2015 Professor Peter Mascuch, PhD Classroom: Main/O’Connor, N-108 Office: Main (O'Connor), N226C 1 semester, 3 credits Office Phone: 631/687-1484 Tues. & Thurs., 1:00 – 3:30 P.M. E-mail: [email protected] We start promptly. Syllabus SITES OF STRUGGLE: AMERICAN LITERATURE'S FIRST-HALF AS AN ONGOING CONTEST OF ART, IDEAS, IDENTITIES, MYTHS, AND VALUES Introduction, Goals, and Objectives “A detailed consideration of the diverse components of American literature, from its beginnings to the Civil War.” – SJCNY Course Catalog Entry “What is ‘art’ but the effort of giving permanent form – in language, in painting, sculpture, music – to those elemental forces in our lives, those passions, hurts, triumphs, and mysteries that have no permanence otherwise, and so require art to be known at all?” – Joyce Carol Oates “Literature is language charged with meaning... Literature is news that stays news.” – Ezra Pound “Every reader finds himself. The writer’s work is merely a kind of optical instrument that makes it possible for the reader to discern what, without this book, he would perhaps never have seen in himself.” – Marcel Proust “Stories are equipment for living.” – Kenneth Burke Required Texts Baym, Nina, General Editor. The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Eighth Edition, Volume I: Beginnings to 1865. W.W. Norton, 2013. Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter and Other Writings. Norton Critical Edition. Edited by Leland S. Person. W.W. Norton, 2004.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
American Lit to 1865 Survey/Syllabus Page 2 Rowson, Susanna. Charlotte Temple. Norton Critical Edition. Edited by Marion L. Rust. W.W. Norton, 2010. Note: The above should be available at the campus bookstore. Any additional readings will be online, or handed out in class, or on reserve at Callahan Library. Core Outcomes : “Quest for Meaning.” Students will be able to formulate and articulate their own view of the meaning of human existence, morality, and the “good life.” Students should achieve a working knowledge of some of the ways in which humans have approached these big questions and attempted to answer them. Summary of Objectives: 1) To become engaged, critical, and “close” readers of American literary texts from various genres and historical periods. 2) To engage with the intersecting and complicated questions of “What is an American?” and “What is American literature?” 3) To recognize how place and time shape a work and influence our understanding of it. 4) To understand what characteristics of a literary work have made it influential and allowed it to endure. 5) To explore how American myths and values are created, challenged, and re-imagined through this literature.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern