a1c7 - Astronomy 1 Last class: ancient greek astronomy,...

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Astronomy 1 I Last class: ancient greek astronomy, geocentric and heliocentric models. I Today: Brahe, Kepler and Galileo. Reading: Chapter 3 I Albert Einstein quote of the day: “The scientist finds his reward in what Henri Poincar` e calls” the joy of comprehension, and not in the possibilities of application to which any discovery may lead.” — from the epilogue to Plank, “Where is Science Going” (1932), 211
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Tycho Brahe I Tycho Brahe (1546 — 1601) best pre-telescopic observations.
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Tycho Brahe I Tycho Brahe (1546 — 1601) best pre-telescopic observations. I Hven Observatory — most accurate instruments of the time.
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Tycho Brahe I Tycho Brahe (1546 — 1601) best pre-telescopic observations. I Hven Observatory — most accurate instruments of the time. I Tycho’s Supernova of 1572 — a new star!
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Tycho Brahe I Tycho Brahe (1546 — 1601) best pre-telescopic observations. I Hven Observatory — most accurate instruments of the time. I Tycho’s Supernova of 1572 — a new star! I Comet of 1577 was more distant than the moon.
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Tycho Brahe I Tycho Brahe (1546 — 1601) best pre-telescopic observations. I Hven Observatory — most accurate instruments of the time. I Tycho’s Supernova of 1572 — a new star! I Comet of 1577 was more distant than the moon. I The Heavens are a dynamic and changing.
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“On the 11th day of November in the evening after sunset, I was contemplating the stars in a clear sky. I noticed that a new and unusual star, surpassing the other stars in brilliancy, was shining almost directly above my head; and since I had, from boyhood, known all the stars of the heavens perfectly, it was quite evident to me that there had never been any star in that place of the sky, even the smallest, to say nothing of a star so conspicuous and bright as this. I was so astonished of this sight that I was not ashamed to doubt the trustworthyness of my own eyes. But when I observed that others, on having the place pointed out to them, could see that there was really a star there, I had no further doubts. A miracle indeed, one that has never been prevoiously seen before our time, in any age since the beginning of the world. (Burnham’s Celestial Handbook)”
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course SCI 1054 taught by Professor Wormer during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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a1c7 - Astronomy 1 Last class: ancient greek astronomy,...

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