MOD 3-Elastic and Inelastic Collision - Module 3 Elastic and inelastic Collision A collision is an isolated event in which two or more bodies(the

MOD 3-Elastic and Inelastic Collision - Module 3 Elastic...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 11 pages.

Figure 2: Examples of collisions Module 3 Elastic and inelastic Collision A collision is an isolated event in which two or more bodies (the colliding bodies) exert relatively strong forces on each other for a relatively short period of time. In other words, a brief event in which two or more bodies come together; "the collision of the particles resulted in an exchange of energy and a change of direction". Although the most common colloquial use of the word "collision" refers to accidents in which two or more objects collide, the scientific use of the word "collision" implies nothing about the magnitude of the forces. Some examples of physical interactions that scientists would consider collisions: An insect touches its antenna to the leaf of a plant. The antenna is said to collide with leaf. A cat walks delicately through the grass. Each contact that its paws make with the ground is a collision. Each brush of its fur against a blade of grass is a collision. When two ships collide each other – called two body collision. In all collisions, momentum is conserved. Energy, as the sum of all its forms, is also conserved every time. These two principles—conservation of momentum and conservation of energy—hold true at all levels: at the grand scale of stars and galaxies, in everyday situations such as collisions between balls on a billiard table, through to the atomic interactions between the particles that make up matter. Collisions are 1

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture