Conductivity of Aqueous Solutions

Conductivity of Aqueous Solutions - Conductivity of Aqueous...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Conductivity of Aqueous Solutions Purpose: In this experiment we’ll learn to classify substances as electrolytes and nonelectrolytes and then those that are electrolytes, we’ll learn how to classify them as strong or weak electrolytes and learn how to write net ionic equations. Introduction: Aqueous solutions of different substances are usually divided into two categories: electrolytes and non-electrolytes. Electrolytes are substances that conduct an electric current, they contain ions in solution. Nonelectrolytes do not contain ions in solution and therefore do not conduct electricity. Electrolytes are further divided into strong electrolytes- the ones that contain many ions in solution- and weak electrolytes – the ones that contain very few ions in solution. Some electrolytes ionize or dissociate completely, or nearly so, in aqueous solutions. The strong acids, strong bases and most soluble salts are in this category. Therefore, when these substances are put in solution we only have ions present. Weak electrolytes ionize or dissociate partially in aqueous solutions. Such solutions conduct current weakly since they contain very few ions in solution. The
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course CHM CHM1045L taught by Professor Pamlergraves during the Spring '08 term at FIU.

Page1 / 3

Conductivity of Aqueous Solutions - Conductivity of Aqueous...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online