lect16_netsim - Interconnect simulation Different levels...

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Interconnect simulation
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Different levels for Evaluating an architecture Numerical models Mathematic formulations to obtain performance characteristics (close form or non-close form) Simulation Simulating the hardware in a program Emulation Prototype Operational system
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Simulation *Jim Kurose, University of Massachusets, Amherst system under study (has deterministic rules governing its behavior) exogenous inputs to system (the environment) system boundary observer “real” life computer program simulates deterministic rules governing behavior psuedo random inputs to system (models environment) program boundary observer “simulated” life
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Why simulation? real-system not available, is complex/costly or dangerous ( eg: space simulations, flight simulations) quickly evaluate design alternatives (eg: different system configurations) evaluate complex functions for which closed form formulas or numerical techniques not available
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Simulation advantages and limitations advantages: sometimes cheaper find bugs (in design) in advance generality: over analytic/numerical techniques detail: can simulate system details at arbitrary level drawbacks: caution: does model reflect reality? large scale systems: lots of resources to simulate (especially accurately simulate) may be slow (computationally expensive – 1 min real time could be hours of simulated time) art: determining right level of model complexity statistical uncertainty in results
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Types of simulators Time driven simulation Cycle/instructor based simulation Stop and observe the system after a fixed time interval (cycle, instruction, etc) Events are assumed to happen at the time interval boundary Event driven simulation Move from one event to another Not at a fixed interval Always simulate the first event in the future – this event may trigger new events before the second event.
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Types of simulators For network simulation, it is more common to use event driven simulation technique.
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