Lecture 17 - What you should have learned: Introduction to...

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Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor CEE 260: Introduction to Environmental and Sustainable Engineering Introduction to Life Cycle Assessment Chapter 11 from Ian Boustead: Introduction to Life Cycle Assessment (Required; see CTools) Rubin Chapter 7 (Pg. 281-314; Required) Vesilind and Morgan Chapter 3 (Pg. 45-48, 61-64; Required) What you should have learned: Introduction to Life Cycle Assessment Objective : How do you quantify emissions associated with engineering decisions? What is the difference between life cycle thinking and life cycle assessment? What do the following terms mean with respect to LCA? Goal Setting, Inventory, Impact, and Improvement Functional unit, reference flow, sustainability triangle What makes inventory assessment difficult? What makes impact assessment difficult? Examples of Inventory and Improvement Analysis: Life Cycle Assessment: An Introduction Life-Cycle Thinking Life-Cycle Stages of an Automobile …anything missing? Extensive Automobile Infrastructure Average Materials Use Per $Million of Construction Cost Automotive Infrastructure
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Life-Cycle Stages of Automobile Infrastructure …anything else missing? The Siberia Axiom The life cycle of any product can be linked to Siberia. Life Cycle Assessment A tool to evaluate the environmental consequences of a product or activity holistically, across its entire life. 1. Goal Definition/Scoping 2. Inventory Analysis 3. Impact Analysis 4. Improvement Analysis Steps of a Formal Life Cycle Assessment Goal Definition and Scoping Defines the purpose and extent of the LCA. It also assures transparency. Goal Definition Goal definition defines the purpose of the study. E.g., a comparative LCA would be very different than an absolute LCA (e.g., vegetable vs. petroleum metalworking fluid).
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Goal Definition and Scoping Goal definition defines the purpose of the study. E.g., a comparative LCA would be very different than an absolute LCA (e.g., vegetable vs. petroleum MWF). Scoping
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Lecture 17 - What you should have learned: Introduction to...

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