3447306.pdf - Action Research in Graduate Management...

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Action Research in Graduate Management Research ProgramsAuthor(s): Chad Perry and Ortun Zuber-SkerrittSource:Higher Education, Mar., 1992, Vol. 23, No. 2, Cumulative Index of HigherEducation 1972-1990 (Mar., 1992), pp. 195-208Published by: SpringerStable URL: JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a widerange of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity andfacilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected]Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available atSpringeris collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access toHigherEducationThis content downloaded from86.59.13.237 on Wed, 20 Oct 2021 18:22:55 UTCAll use subject to
Higher Education 23: 195-208, 1992.? 1992 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.Action research in graduate management research programsCHAD PERRY & ORTUN ZUBER-SKERRITTQueensland University of Technology, Griffith University, AustraliaAbstract. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how action research may be applied tomanagement research programs. After distinguishing action research from traditional reestablishing that the former is more appropriate for developing managerial competencieslatter, the paper discusses issues of conducting action research within a graduate managemenprogram. These issues centre on the key concept of distinguishing between action research prothesis action research project. Distinctions between action research projects at Masters andare noted. It is argued that ideally the core action research project has to be part of the PhDfull-time work. Future difficulties are canvassed.IntroductionHow can graduate research be made more relevant to management practice?Currently, much management research is written for an academic audience only.Research output is usually perceived by academics to be the distinguishingcharacteristic of 'better' higher education management schools (Porter andMcKibbin 1988, p. 174). However, this research output is of dubious relevance tomanagers. In the HarvardBusiness Review, Behrman and Levin (1984, p. 141) state:For the most part, given the thousands of faculty members doing it, the research in businessadministration duing the past 20 years would fail any reasonable test of applicability or relevance toconsequential managment problems or policy issues concerning the role of business nationally orinternationally.Moreover, Porter and McKibbin (1988, p. 170) surveyed some 200 senior USexecutives who were 'among those most interested in, and knowledgeable about,business schools and business school education. They found that the executives'view of the direct effect of academics' research management practice was scathing:...as far as we could tell, many key managers and executives pay little or no attention to such research or

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