Friction lab

Friction lab - Amanda Runey PHY111 Segvich 21 February 2008...

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Amanda Runey PHY111 Segvich 21 February 2008 Friction Lab Introduction When an object is in motion, friction resists its movement. The friction between two objects depends on the materials that are on contact with one another. It also depends on the weight of the object moving over the other. This experiment sought to discover how the mass of the object and the angle of contact effect the movements of the objects. Procedures / Methods For the first half of the experiment we placed a wooden plank flat on the lab table. Then we attached the Newton scale to a wooden cart and then pulled the cart with the scale. We recorded both the amount of force it took to get the cart moving, and then the amount of force it took to keep the cart sliding across the wood. After this we calculated both the static and kinetic friction. We put a 5N weight in the cart and repeated the procedure. We repeated the steps with a wooden block placed on its large side and then again on its small side. Then we placed the plank of wood on a 5º incline and repeated all the previous procedures. After this, we placed the cart on the end of the plank and raised the plank until the cart just started to move and then recorded what angle the plank was at to the table. We did this with the cart plus weight and the wooden block also. Then we repeated all these steps but this time we
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This lab report was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course PHY 111 taught by Professor Segvich during the Spring '08 term at Washtenaw.

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Friction lab - Amanda Runey PHY111 Segvich 21 February 2008...

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