YSaunders_Balancing_Ecosystem - 1 Balancing Ecosystems...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

1 Balancing Ecosystems Yadira Saunders ENV/100 August 04, 2015 Professor Michael Brandolino 4553 Independence Point Sparksville, CA 95521
2 August 4, 2015 Glimmerville City Council 241 E Academy Blvd Glimmerville, CA 95532 Dear Glimmerville City Council, It has come to my attention that Glimmerville is currently struggling with an invasive fish species, Grass Carp, as Sparksville did earlier this year. Now I am not aware of the original purpose this fish species was introduced to your ecosystem, however, the challenge it is causing, and caused here too, seems to be similar in how it is affecting the city of Glimmerville. On behalf of the Environment and Energy Committee and the city of Sparksville, I would like to extend our assistance in resolving the Grass Carp issue Glimmerville is currently experiencing. We first introduced Grass Carp back in the late 70’s, when our agricultural lands changed fertilizers to a more eco-friendly one. After a while, this new fertilizer began making its way to our streams and rivers and, because it was eco-friendly, vegetation began growing in these streams and rivers, causing our community waterways to clog. Almost immediately, we began researching for the most safe, natural solution we could think of to solve this issue without damaging the environment in any way. Introducing Grass Carp into our ecosystem proved to be the safest solution at the time. Little did we know that a few years later down the road, this natural solution would multiply in an un-imaginary way and overpopulate our reservoir, crowding out our native species, and making their way into our community waterways. “It was clear to us that natural selection worked, but only to the advantage of the carp”. (GameScape Info) Sparksville was faced with a new challenge. Again, we began searching for the safest yet, most natural solution we could think of without damaging the environment. Since the carp are an indigenous fish species of Asia, there are no known predators in the U.S. However, we did find that our native large-mouth bass species, do feed on the younger carp. The greater issue was with the adult Carp as they “grow to a maximum of 59 inches, 99 pounds, and live up to 21 years”. (E&E Committee PDF)

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture