paper2 - Blaming the Victims Kaitlin Walaska Soc 395: Jr....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Blaming the Victims Kaitlin Walaska Paper #2 04/01/08
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Economic Globalization In 2005 a terrible hurricane hit New Orleans and devastated the area leaving many people homeless and others stranded to die in their own homes. After this happened the Nation responded in somewhat surprising ways. One of the many racist ways we responded was when the victims decided to take matters into their own hands and stop waiting for the evacuation transportations and started walking, “But when… hundreds did attempt to escape the city by walking across a bridge into the white suburb of Gretna, they were turned back by panicky local police who fired over their heads.” (Davis, 2005). Instead of opening our arms to victims of a tragedy, we got scared as if their misfortune would rub off onto the more “privileged”. In some cases people were “blaming the victims”, people were telling lies to make it seem like the people left in the ruins of New Orleans were criminals who didn’t deserve good help. Others saw it as a time to act on changing New Orleans into a cleaner, quieter, richer and most of all “whiter” place. After hurricane Katrina ripped through New Orleans the media reported on the increasing crime rates. They made it seem as though everyone left in New Orleans was African American, poor, violent and criminals. In reality some of the 2
Background image of page 2
stories the media reported were false. In the Article Katrina: Rumors, Lies, and Racist Fantasies, Slavoj Zizek (2008) talks about the factual pieces of criminality that was really going on, and how we twisted them to show a racist view of the people in New Orleans: “Of course, the sense of menace had been ignited by genuine disorder and violence: Looting, ranging from base thievery to foraging for the necessities of life, did occur after the storm…However, the (limited) reality of crimes in no way exonerates ‘reports’ on the total breakdown of law and order—not because the reports were ‘exaggerated,’ but for a much more radical reason…Even if all the reports on violence and rapes had proven to be factually true, the stories circulating about them would still be ‘pathological’ and racist,
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course SOC 395 taught by Professor Klocke during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Plattsburgh.

Page1 / 8

paper2 - Blaming the Victims Kaitlin Walaska Soc 395: Jr....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online