Week 3 Notes- the High Middle Ages

Week 3 Notes- the High Middle Ages - The High Middle Ages...

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The High Middle Ages (11 th – 13 th century) Week 3 Notes - Those Who Prey: Latin Church Insiders o Stability and growth 11 th century transition Population growth Stronger secular realm Economic revival Church benefits o Petrine Doctrine Leo I Gregory the Great Rome first Peter’s heirs o Cycles of Reform Cenobitic monasticism Monasticism origin o The first monks are what we call eremitic monks Based on the model provide by the hermits of the Egyptian desert Best epitomized by St. Anthony (life told by Athanasius) o Over time the rigors of the eremitic model were overly challenging to most who sought a life of devotion to God, and the Cenobitic (communitarian model of monastic life) appeared Based on the Rule of Benedict of Nursia Focused on community, manual labor and obedience to a set of rules that were both restrictive and also tolerable to those who sought a life devoted to worship and their own salvation Spread widely across Europe o Provided a model for the contemplative, celibate life on the monks and nuns even to the fringes of Christian penetration Cluniac monasteries Foundation- 910 o Given a land grant by the Duke of Aquitaine, William He did this (along with an endowment) because he was concerned with his own salvation upon his death Freedom from secular control
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o Founded with the main objective of having no secular ties Worldly monastic leadership Peter the Venerable, the last great leader Women and monasticism Were actually more free than in the outside world Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) o A correspondent of both Church and political leaders throughout Europe o Composer, painter, poet, and wrote the first medical textbook of female physiology During the same period of the spread of monasticism, the Papacy was increasing in its ambition o State of the Empire (Holy Roman Empire) Deepening faith Theocratic rule Successful Church 11 th century Precarious unity o Papal Reform and Gregorian Revolution Leo IX (1049-1054) Gregory VII (1073-1085) Investiture Controversy o Concordat at Worms (1122) Problems Simony o The sale of offices Nepotism o Use of power to grant/appoint offices for allies (family, friends who are not suitable) Pluralism o The holding of multiple offices by the same person (man) Lay investiture o The process in which the non-clerical world was making decisions about the Church (and its rulers) o Popes and Monks o Contests for Authority Glories of the Gothic Revolution Gothic revolution 1140: Abbot Suger of St. Denis
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Church filled with light o Pointed arches o Flying buttresses o Stained glass windows Pilgrims and their money Vezelay Romanesque glory o La Madeleine - The Crusades for the Holy Land: 1095-1291 o Background to the Crusades Crusading culture “Peace of God” Pax Dei 1071 Manzikert Seljuk Turks Arrived from central Asia in the 11
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course HIST 12 taught by Professor Andrews during the Winter '08 term at Santa Clara.

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Week 3 Notes- the High Middle Ages - The High Middle Ages...

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