Lecture Jan 15 - Food from roots, stems and leaves Annual...

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Food from roots, stems and leaves Annual and biennial vegetable crops o Mustard family—Brassicaceae Most vegetables come from this family Many are varieties of the same species Brassica oleracea Early form of plant probably similar to kale Typically eat just the leaves of cabbage and other plants like it Cabbage o Compact shoot system—stem does not elongate o Important in Europe as peasant food Can be harvested late, stores well o Can be shredded and mixed with salt for preservation Brussels sprouts o Lateral buds that do not expand Sliced it looks like a tiny cabbage Kohlrabi o Base of stem expands Leaves look normal but there is a swollen stem Broccoli o Mass of flower buds Cauliflower o Mass of stem tips
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o Modern varieties lack chlorophyll cauliflower is created which does not create mass chlorophyll Broccoflower=cauliflower with chlorophyll Turnips o The hypocotyls—part where the stem and root meet—is the part that is eaten on the turnip o Were cultivated in Europe as a source of seed o The flesh of turnips is usually white o Roots are flat on top and tinged with purple o Yellow fleshed varieties are grown but not commonly found in stores o Are not as strong in flavor as the rutabaga Rutabagas o Are more nutritious and have a more pronounced flavor than turnips o Hybrid between a cabbage and a turnip o In Europe, rutabagas are used for domesticated animals o In the US, rutabagas are yellow and larger than turnips o Shippers often coat rutabagas in wax to prevent drying Radishes o In the United States, radishes are used for garnishing purposes and carved to resemble roses o Radishes, however, were much more important to the ancient Egyptians for food and oilseed
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o The vegetable is still important in China, Japan and other Asian countries
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Lecture Jan 15 - Food from roots, stems and leaves Annual...

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