Prion - Prion Propagation Remember, prions propagate by...

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Prion Propagation QuickTime™ and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture. •Remember, prions propagate by converting other copies of the same protein to an infectious form (the “prion form”). –The infectious form of prions that has been best studied is a condensed amyloid (literally a “starch-like substance”, used to describe a hard waxy deposit of protein and/or polysaccharides that is often correlated with tissue degeneration).
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Prion Propagation QuickTime™ and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture. •Conversion to the infectious form can have several different results: –A toxic amyloid - in TSEs (Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies) –An inactive (or less active) protein in amyloid form - PSI , PIN , URE3 –An active protein in amyloid form - [ß], Het-s and C (the last two are Podospora anserina prions) •[ß] and C may not be amyloids when infectious.
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Genetic Criteria for Prions •The simplest criterion is non-Mendelian inheritance
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Prion - Prion Propagation Remember, prions propagate by...

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