Secularisation of the European mind Revision

Secularisation of - Secularisation of the European mind What can the events at Lourdes and Marpingen tell us about the"secularization of the

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Secularisation of the European mind What can the events at Lourdes and Marpingen tell us about the “secularization of the European mind”? Did the “secularization of the European mind” owe more to social change in the nineteenth century than it did to scientific discovery? Secularization - Secularization embraces both changes in society and in society’s self understanding, and the emergence and re-expression of intellectual challenges to the Christian faith and its theological formulations. - Any study of secularization must therefore be a study of the inter-relationship of social and intellectual history; - Ideas of Marx, Renan, Darwin and Comte. - For most of its history, European culture was inseparable from religious values and institutions; after the eighteenth century this was no longer the case. - By the nineteenth century, intellectual life seemed to be dominated by history, economics, sociology and natural science. - Not by theology or even theologically informed philosophy. - Commissions for architects were museums, libraries, and other public buildings. - Composers were involved in symphonies and sonata’s - What we think of 19 th century culture was predominantly secular, sustained by secular values and directed towards secular ends. - Max Weber: the world had been disenchanted, drained of its sacred rituals and supernatural meanings. The place of religion - Ebbing of religious faith gathered momentum after 1800. - Though it would be a mistake to equate the secularization of high culture with the disappearance of religion from social, political or cultural life. - Religion’s decline was relative, not absolute. - Theology remained an active branch of learning; churches continued to be built and religious music was still written. - There is also ample evidence that religious commitments continued to play an important role in most people’s lives. - Intensity of belief differed across Europe; in some regions, like the peasant community of Brittany- intense piety. - Elsewhere, such as the Limousin, Christianity had almost disappeared. - From this variety of religious practice came some of the century’s most bitter conflicts. - The apparent secularization of high culture therefore did not destroy religion, but it did transform it into an accepted fact of cultural life into a problem; something to be analysed, explained, defended or attacked. - Far from disappearing in the 19 th century religion was a matter of great importance, and for many intellectuals, close to an obsession.
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Nineteenth century intellectual’s points of view - Radical German intellectuals who had gathered in Berlin in 1830- saw theological problems to be of major concern since religious reform seemed to be the first step towards a larger transformation of society. -
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course HIST culture an taught by Professor Drclarke during the Spring '08 term at Trinity College Dublin.

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Secularisation of - Secularisation of the European mind What can the events at Lourdes and Marpingen tell us about the"secularization of the

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