CH 7 - BRING A DRINK ON WEDNESDAY Learning-A permanent...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BRING A DRINK ON WEDNESDAY Learning -A permanent change in an organism's behavior due to experience How Do We Learn? -We learn by association. Our minds naturally connect events that occur in sequence -2000 years ago, Aristotle suggested the law of association. Then 200 years ago Locke and Hume reiterated this law. Associative Learning -Learning to associate one stimulus with another -Two related events Stimulus 1: lighting + Stimulus 2: Thunder -Results After Repetition Stimulus: We see lightning Response: we wince in anticipating thunder -Learning to associate a response with a consequence a. response: balance a ball b. consequence: receive a treat c. behavior strengthened Classical Conditioning -It was the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov who elucidated classical conditioning. Pavlov's Experiments -Before conditioning, food (Unconditioned Stimulus, US . .. food naturally causes a response in the dog.) produces salivation (Unconditional response, UR) -However, the tone (neutral stimulus) creates no response -During conditioning, the neutral stimulus (tone) and the US (food) are paired, resulting in salivation (UR). -After condition, the neutral stimulus (now a Conditioned Stimulus, CS) elicits salivation (Now a Conditioned Response, CR) Acquisition -The initial learning stage in classical conditioning in which an association between a neutral stimulus and an unconditioned stimulus takes place 1. In most cases, for conditioning to occur, the neutral stimulus needs to come
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 4

CH 7 - BRING A DRINK ON WEDNESDAY Learning-A permanent...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online