Dionysus - Why do you think many myths about Dionysus the...

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Why do you think many myths about Dionysus – the god of wine, intoxication and sensuality present him as "un-Greek"? Why does myth picture him travelling among foreign nations and afflicted with madness? The Greek Gods, as described by Homer and Hesiod, were slightly more than grand representations of human beings. Sharing similar characteristics, these gods were exceptionally good at deceit and concealment. To humans they appeared calm and composed, however once behind close doors their petty jealousies and conniving way's blossomed. Be it one time or another, there was always a god sneaking away for sex, tricking another god, or exacting revenge. This general disposition fit all gods save one, Dionysus. The origin surrounding Dionysus is a mystery itself, as judging from mythology, he is the combination of two gods. One myth states, that he was the son of Zeus and a mortal, Semele. Tricked by a jealous Hera, Semele persuaded Zeus into revealing his true form, resulting in her combustion. Her unborn baby was saved from her ashes by Hermes and sewn into Zeus's thigh, from where he was born and eventually taken to Mount Nysa to be raised. Hence his name, Dion (Dios -meaning God or Zeus) and Nysus (Nysa - the mountain he was raised on). The second most accepted myth states that Zeus had an affair with Persephone, resulting in Dionysus being born. Jealous Hera used the Titans to lure the baby and eat him. Zeus defeated them, rescuing only the heart of Dionysus which
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Dionysus - Why do you think many myths about Dionysus the...

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