Lesson_--_Paragraphs__6.21.12 ENGL 0307 Developmental Writing II.docx

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ENGL 0307: Developmental Writing IILesson: ParagraphsThis self-guided writing lesson and those that follow are meant to be read. Reading isfundamental to writing; one improves the other. By reading, you see how writing is done.Knowing that, I have tried to model good writing for you. As you read these lessons, pleasenotice how they’re punctuated and organized so you improve your own writing.What this isA paragraph is the first level at which sentences are organized into a body of writing. Whilesome professions such as journalism and business alter the academic-paragraph style a bit, it isused for everything from answering a short-essay question in college to completing a jobapplication. In fact, for some career fields, paragraphs are the most-used unit of writing, as in theprogress reports that nurses type about patients every shift. Paragraphs matter, making thedifference between passing or not and between getting hired or not. (They certainly matter forthose hospital patients who depend on the message being conveyed effectively to the nextcaregiver!) Paragraphs are the subunit for the larger bodies of writing that are also important:term papers, scholarship essays, cover letters, and work reports. In fact, each paragraph is like amini-essay. Get them right, and the transition to bigger writing will make so much more sense.This lesson covers every part of a proper paragraph so yours are effective.What this is notThis lesson does not repeat the exercises of the previous lesson about writing steps, whichintroduced the parts of a paragraph. Those exercises will be reused for the first paragraph-writingassignment that follows.In addition, as mentioned before, this course is not a full primer on syntax, the rules for arrangingwords into sentences, yet that is what we will be doing for the paragraph assignments. If youcan’t remember the grammar rules, follow Professor Lynch’s Writing Reminder #1: If in doubt,check it out. If still in doubt, leave it out. Why write something that one of your readers willknow is wrong? It’s better to rewrite it in a different way, as with a synonym, or to leave it out.Should you need to check something, your notes of these lessons and the textbook are references.For additional review, do Aplia or textbook practice problems. To assist with more in-depthissues, handouts are posted on the class website. (Titles of related handouts are listed in thecourse schedule.) Ask classmates for their advice, too. A blog was set up for that under theLessons tab on the class website. In addition, remember that tutors and the instructor are alwaysavailable to answer questions as they arise.

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Term
Fall
Professor
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Tags
Writing, Professor Bob Lynch

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