Midterm_PartB_Essay - Hist 259 Professor Hyams 10/27/08...

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Hist 259 Professor Hyams 10/27/08 Wurzburg Annalist on the Second Crusade 1. The writer indicates that the overall goals of the crusade were to fight against the Saracen  forces and liberate the parts of the Kingdom of Jerusalem that had been lost.  Other sources  from this time period, although supporting the idea of fighting against Saracens, are quite  indistinct on their designation of any distinct final goal.   For the most part, they address the  Second Crusade in light of the First, stating that the current crusaders should do as their  ancestors did.  These statements appear to be quite vague because most of them were given  before the crusade when it was unknown whether or not the crusade would be successful, or  after   the   crusade   when   admitting   that   their   goal   was   not   reached   would   have   been  embarrassing.  The writer here however, has a negative outlook on the Second Crusade and  thus has no reservations when explicitly stating that the liberation of lands previously held by the  kingdom of Jerusalem was the goal, which indicates that the Crusade was a failure. 2. This piece of writing was created in 1147, near the end of the Second Crusade.  This would  have influenced the writer’s view on the matter as he was able to observe the Crusade in its 
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entirety and make an analysis of it.  Also, because the writer was able to see that the Crusade  was a failure, he would have had a much more negative tone in his writing as opposed to a 
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Midterm_PartB_Essay - Hist 259 Professor Hyams 10/27/08...

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