Goldfield Chapter 5 - American Journey Chapter 5...

This preview shows page 1 - 12 out of 59 pages.

American Journey Chapter 5 : Imperial Breakdown, 1763-1774
Challenges of Control and FinanceBritain’s empire in 1763 was immense, and its problems correspondingly large. It faced threats from traditional European enemies France and Spain, as well as from new subjects in acquired lands.Concerns about imperial authority extended to the inhabitants of the existing colonies themselves.
Challenges of Control and Finance(cont'd)Wartime expenses caused British debt to balloon, and Americans would be asked to shoulder more of the financial burden.
Native Americans and Frontier ConflictThe British government kept a large body of troops in America in peacetime in order to maintain peace with the Indians.Tensions between the colonists and Indians led to fierce conflict in the Cherokee War and Pontiac’s War.
Native Americans and Frontier Conflict(cont'd)Ongoing troubles included the Paxton Boys crisis.Cherokee WarConflict (1759–1761) on the southern frontier between the Cherokee Indians and colonists from Virginia southward. It caused South Carolina to request the aid of British troops and resulted in the surrender of more Indian land to white colonists.
Native Americans and Frontier Conflict(cont'd)Pontiac’s WarIndian uprising (1763–1766) led by Pontiac of the Ottawas and Neolin of the Delawares. Fearful of their fate at the hands of the British after the French had been driven out of North America, the Indian nations of the Ohio River Valley and the Great Lakes area united to oust the British from the Ohio-Mississippi Valley. They failed and were forced to make peace in 1766.
Dealing with the New TerritoriesThe issues raised by Pontiac’s War moved Britain to assert imperial control over the territories it had acquired from France.Proclamation of 1763Royal proclamation setting the boundary known as the Proclamation Line.
Dealing with the New Territories(cont'd)Quartering ActsActs of Parliament requiring colonial legislatures to provide supplies and quarters for the troops stationed in America. Americans considered this taxation in disguise and objected. None of these acts passed during the pre-Revolutionary controversy required that soldiers be quartered in an occupied house without the owner’s consent.
MAP 5–1 Colonial Settlement and the MAP 5–1 Colonial Settlement and the Proclamation Line of 1763Proclamation Line of 1763
The Search for Revenue:The Sugar ActCompounding Britain’s problem of soaring national debt was a postwar recession that struck both it and the colonies.The Sugar Act was passed to help defray the costs of empire, while also taking aim at smugglers.
The Search for Revenue:The Sugar ActNew Englanders predominated those colonists actively opposed to the Sugar Act.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture